Micromax A115 Canvas 3D review

Micromax is following Samsungs footsteps in milking its flagship brand, Canvas series, adding new handsets across price segments with differentiated features. The Canvas 3D is one such effort. The company aims to lure users by offering a 3D smartphone at a never heard before price point. While phones with 3D display including offerings from LG and HTC have failed to create a niche for themselves after the initial buzz, we try to find out if the Canvas 3D offers something different.

TheMicromax A115 Canvas 3Dsports the same phablet form factor that weve seen in the A110 Canvas 2. The phone is broad and bulky, and theres nothing that weve not seen so far, in terms of design.

The 5-inch screen dominates the front along with markings for three capacitive touch buttons below the display, and the earpiece, front facing camera and proximity sensor above it. Just like the Canvas 2, theres no Micromax branding on the front. Theres a metallic frame around the phone that appears to be of Champagne colour. On the right side, theres a power key, while the volume rocker sits on the left hand side. Both these keys are made of plastic and kind of lack refinement, in our opinion.

The Micro-USB port and the 3.5mm audio ports sit at the top of the phone. The back cover is Black in colour and is made of plastic. It sports a soft matte finish. Theres some Micromax branding at the back including what looks like a sticker. The 5-megapixel rear camera lens sits at the top with the dual-LED flash located just below lens. The lens protrudes out a bit and is surrounded by a circular chrome ring. The speaker outlet is located at the bottom.

The Micromax A115 is a dual-SIM dual-standby GSM + GSM smartphone. The SIM Card slots and a slot for the micro SD card hide behind the back cover just above the battery slot.

The Micromax A115 comes with a 5-inch 16.7m colour capacitive touch screen sporting a resolution of 480×800 pixels. We found the screen resolution to be pretty low for a device of this size, and the graphics and text appeared to be less sharp. The viewing angles are not that good though the under-sun visibility on the phone was decent, in spite the screen being highly reflective. Its worth pointing out that the Canvas 3D comes with naked-eye 3D, which means you dont have to wear special glasses to view 3D content on the screen. The phone uses the parallax barrier technique to create a sense of depth resulting in the 3D effect without the need for glasses.

The parallax barrier effect essentially works by placing a second screen in front of the display and filling the gap with special material that helps in directing light in a way that both our eyes see different sets of images so that the brain takes them as one and gets an illusion of depth. The disadvantage is that it only works when you look at the screen from a particular angle.

Its worth pointing out that when you turn on the phone for the first time, you wont notice any 3D effect until you visit the 3D Space app, though theres an option to display the 3D Space menu when you tilt the phone to landscape mode.

Since the phone uses the parallax barrier technique for 3D, youd end up with a headache after straining your eyes if you try to watch 3D content for too long as the brain tends to get disoriented after continuously looking at two distinct images as one image.

We observed that the screen also looks a little dull compared to the Canvas 2.

The Micromax Canvas HD runs Android 4.1.2 (Jelly Bean). Micromax has skinned some elements of the user interface, such as the app icons, Settings menu and the notification tray. The notification tray includes toggles for settings such as Wi-Fi, Brightness, Rotation, Bluetooth, GPS, Data, Screen timeouts and profiles (for alerts and other notifications). Similar to most other Android devices, there are five customisable home screens that can be filled with app shortcuts and widgets.

As we mentioned earlier, youd only be able to see a 3D user interface when you go to the 3D Guide or 3D Space apps although theres an option to display the 3D Space menu when you tilt the phone to landscape mode.

The notification tray also features a settings shortcut and a clear all notifications button, along with expandable notifications (expanded with the two finger pull gesture). Android 4.1 Jelly Bean also brings in Google Now, which needs to be initialised for the first time, before use.

The three capacitive buttons, Home, Menu and Back help in navigating through the phone, with the Home button also doubling up as an app switcher on long press.

Micromax has also included some of its own apps including its own apps and content store, M! Store, and services store, M! Zone+, in addition to its messaging app, HookUp, and friends locator app, M! Buddy and a few games (mostly trial versions) including Fruit Devil, Bubble Bash 3, Battleship Connect4, and The Dark Man. Micromax has also modified the Messages app, adding a button for attaching multimedia, contacts and audio clips, among others, with it. It has also added a file manager app, in addition to a universal search app, and a video player app. It has also replaced the stock camera app with a different one. The company has also included a Wireless Input Device app, letting users configure a Bluetooth-based input device with the phone.

Micromax has also deployed its own Slide lock screen which lets you unlock the phone and directly access the phone dialer, messaging app, 3D Space or the home screen.

Coming to the 3D features of the phone, Micromax offers a dedicated zone that it likes to call 3D Space that allows you to browse 3D content including 3D games, 3D online videos on YouTube, and 3D pictures and videos stored on the phone. It also offers a shortcut to instructions for accessing and creating 3D content and to the still cameras 3D recording mode.

The 3D Space navigation also includes big 3D icons and animation effects.

Games that are compatible with 3D are listed under the 3D Games app as Play Store links with just one game, Fruit Devil, a trial version of which comes bundled with the phone being compatible. Games like Jetpack Joyride and Fruit Ninja Puss In Boots are 3D compatible and are rendered in 3D if accessed via the 3D games menu.

You can run 3D videos even force 2D videos to be rendered in 3D adjusting the vertical or horizontal depth of the parallax barrier. Same is the case with videos. 3D YouTube videos are accessible via a link that opens in the browser. In terms of bundled 3D content, the phone is a disappointment.

The phone features a 5-megapixel autofocus shooter that takes decent quality images in daylight. However, we found that macro shots taken through the phone did not come out well and lacked clarity. Photos taken indoors under artificial light were grainy. The camera takes good quality videos depending on the ambient light. However, it saves video clips in .3GP file format, which is an older file format.

The camera app also offers a 3D still capture mode that essentially stitches two photos to create an illusionary 3D effect. The instructions to shoot a 3D picture can only be found in the 3D Guide app. To Shoot a 3D photo one needs to first click the base picture and then move the camera horizontally to take the other picture following which the phone creates a 3D picture with the two and saves it in .MPO file format. Its worth pointing out that the picture will be rendered in 3D only on the phone.

The 3D images shot using the phone did not look impressive or 3D like even though we followed the procedure given in the phones 3D Guide of shooting the photo from a distance of 0.5 to 2 metres and moving the camera 0.5 to 2.5 centimetre horizontally between two consecutive shots.

Although we were able to open the 3D pictures on our PC, we did not see any 3D effect and the photos turned out to be a set of 2 normal 2D images. The phones camera does not offer the capability to record 3D video.

The camera app also offers Panorama and HDR options, in addition to a continuous mode allowing users to shoot up to 99 continuous still shots. It includes the usual settings for exposure, sharpness, ISO, saturation, contrast and others.

The phone has a VGA camera that can be used for casual video chats.

The phone is powered by a 1GHz dual-core processor that is a MediaTek chip, and has 512MB of RAM on board. We did not encounter any crashes while working on the phone and multitasking was comfortable. We did not notice much lag while navigating through the menu, and while playing casual games.

We were able to play 1020p HD video clips, and 720p clips, though the 1080p clips stuttered. The phone supports .AVI and .MOV videos natively.

The phone comes with the native Android browser and renders all webpages well. The phone doesnt come with Adobe Flash. The speaker on the phone delivers decent quality sound but volume levels are low. Also, since the speaker is located at the back, the volume levels further decrease when the phone lies on its back. The phone surprisingly doesnt include an ambient light-sensor, so theres no setting for automatic brightness, and the user would need to manually set brightness levels for the screen.

Call quality was good. The phone is a dual-SIM GSM phone with support for one active and the other in active-standby mode.

The Micromax Canvas 3D comes with a 2000mAh battery and we were satisfied with the backup that it offered. With intermediate usage during the day, including playing games, a few calls, and e-mail and Twitter notifications turned on, we were able to get a full day of backup.

With the Canvas 3D, Micromax tries to offer a differentiated experience among budget phones and wants to consolidate its position in the segment with the more features in an economy price strategy. We feel that the phone falls short of delivering a good 3D experience and 3D is more of a gimmick without doing anything to enhance the user experience. In fact, youd end up with a headache after straining your eyes if you try to watch 3D content for too long on the Canvas 3Ds screen. The low resolution screen of the phone and its poor viewing angles make things worse.

Wed advise you to look at the Micromax Canvas 2 or the other options from Indian handset makers such as the Karbonn S1 Titanium or the Zen Ultrafone 701 HD, if youre in the market for a value for money Android handset that delivers a good set of features.

Micromax A115 Canvas 3D: In pictures

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Tough 3D Ink Settings

I got a Micro as my first printer last week. So far I love it and Ive had no problems, but Im trying to load a spool of Tough 3D Ink that I ordered from M3D with my printer and the cheat code is showing as invalid. The code is T-G-B.

I tried for the last hour to find information about the print temp for this ink on the internet, but there is literally no info. Anybody used this? Whats a good temperature?

Has anyone used this Tough 3D on the Makerbot? I can get it to go through the extruder

I dont have an M3D but I have been experimenting with the material. It prints best on my QIDI at 255 with a heat bed temp of 40 (it also sticks on the bed by itself just better when heated). I had a hard time getting it to run through the gears at anything less. This stuff is less ridged than Flex when coming off the spool.

I finally received my filament order this week and got around to trying it tonight.

The code on the spool (TGB) auto set the temperature to 220. This is with version 2016-05-06-v1.4.2.5-MAC.

The invoice that came with my order said to use a temperature of 225.

Neither of those worked at all for me.

I bumped the temperature by 5, and tried again. And again. Etc.

When I got to 245, that seemed to do the trick for me. The raft didnt look as good as a corresponding PLA one, but the model came out fine.

Ill just copy paste what I replied to you on the official forums so that people here can see as well:

Use code FLX, it works for me on flexible filament. Its weird, they put code TGB on the tough ink, but it doesnt seem to work for anyone. Try FLX and it should put the temperature around 245

I use FLX.. works great, I really like the stuff.. I hear the newer software and maybe firmwares are going to lower the temp from 245 to 225.. but honestly Im not having an issue with it..

Yes they dont have that code programmed in yet. Use TGH. I found that it printed better if the temp was set to 225 degrees. At the original 245 degrees, it stuck to the print tack way too much and support material was impossible to remove in some places. It might print even better at 220.

So M3D support got back to me. Heres what they said:

The cheat code that you need to be entering is TGH. To ensure the code works, please make sure that you have our latest software installed on your computer. Please also be mindful that our Tough 3D Ink is intended for external port use only and that a printing temperature of 225 C is recommended. If the code is still not working or you do not want to install our latest software, you can simply enter PLA and change the temperature to 225.

Im about to give it a try. Will update.

If you use v1.4.2.3, then listen to what they said, but if you use v1.4.0.x, then use FLX. I still dont understand why they promote TGH so much, because FLX is the one that works.

Well, neither FLX or TGH is reading as valid. Ive just loaded it and manually changed the temp, so well see what happens.

As far as my software version, it says Im on v1.3.6.5 and that there are no updates. So theres that.

The M3D software doesnt tell you whether or not there is an update, but infact there is. The Tough 3D Ink was officially supported in the v1.4.0.X series (and v1.4.2.3). Id highly advise you update to a v1.4.0.X or v1.4.2.3 software if you want it to work.

I had looked carefully through those downloadables and didnt find anything newer that wasnt in beta. I just downloaded v1.4.0.9 and Ill give it a shot.

Worth mentioning that Im on Mac and there are far fewer updates for OS X than Windows.

That said, I just did a test print with v1.4.0.9 and everything worked — it got the cheat code and everything. Thanks!

Yeah Ive used this before. A big misconception is that the code is TGH or TGB. This is wrong. The code you must use for Tough 3D ink is FLX. Make sure it is FLX or else it most likely wont work. FLX has worked great for me, and everyone else Ive told over on the forums

Hi, Ive read somewhere that it should be 245 C.

As for the code, in the January software version Ive noticed there is the TGH code I suppose you can use this one.

This is scary, since I just ordered my M3D and a few spools of ink. One of the spools is the tough ink. Ill find out Monday night if Im screwed. Have you tried contacting their support?

Not sure if you saw my update that I heard from support. I was in the same situation — I ordered one spool of yellow regular PLA, and two spools of Tough 3D, so I was scared too that I would be screwed. Im about to try a print so Ill let you know what happens.

here is a list of every cheat code on this website

Thanks for the reply, but Ive already checked this page several times. The Tough 3D Ink isnt listed anywhere on it, in any color. Its almost like M3D didnt finish rolling it out to the public.

Do you have the latest firmware loaded?

It automatically updated the firmware when I started. The expert mode window says I have version 2015-10-23-03… does that mean its from last year? Is there a newer version?

i have had mine since beginning of 2016. and there hasnt been a update since. Sorry the link didnt help. If i find it ill let you know.

Panasonic 125mm f12 LUMIX G 3D

Reviewing a 3D lens naturally requires the hardware–TV and glasses–to view the effect, as the back of the current Panasonic cameras do not serve to show you 3D. So along with the new 12.5mm lens, Panasonic sent us a rather large plasma display, the TC-P50GT25 50-inch TV, and a couple of pairs of TY-EW3D10U battery-operated 3D glasses. Working together, the TV and glasses deliver an alternating 60 frames per second to each eye, which means that the TV puts out 120 frames per second, total. Called, the technology is universal to current 3D televisions, but it seems the brand of glasses needs to be matched to the television.

We shot a number of images of different subjects, including trees, dogs, kids, buildings, and cars. That gave us a pretty good feel for what the Lumix 12.5mm 3D lens could do. Though the active shutter technology built into the TV is optimized to deliver smooth video, according to marketing materials, the Panasonic GF2 does not produce videos with the 12.5mm 3D lens, only stills. The lens is also only compatible with the G2, GH2, and GF2 Micro Four Thirds cameras; currently no Olympus Pen Micro Four Thirds models support the lens. The camera can be set to record just the 3D image in MPO (Multi-Picture Object) format, or else the MPO plus JPEG in fine or compressed formats. Note that the resolution of the JPEG captured is 1.4 megapixels (1,600 x 904), because the lens is just laying down two images side by side on the cameras sensor. The MPO is essentially the same times two, so dont be expecting lush 12 or 16-megapixel images; the 3D images from this lens are intended primarily for electronic viewing.

ISO-Standard Dog. Charlotte the dog sat for the rare static photo, but only when she heard it was 3D. She fairly leaps from the screen in this sharp shot.

Download MPO fileto play on a 3D television.

While using the lens was fun, we were quickly disappointed with a few aspects. One is that the very small, and fixed aperture of f/12 limits your shooting to bright daylight. The lens is hyperfocal, meaning that you dont need to focus. Objects from 1.97 feet (60 cm) to infinity should be in focus in all shots; thats really what you want for 3D, so no foul there. And though its a 12.5mm focal length, the angle of view is actually quite a bit narrower than a 12.5mm lens would be with any other MFT lens, again because its projectingtwoimages side by side on the sensor (it should be a 25mm equivalent). Panasonic calls it 65mm equivalent at 16:9, and wed have to agree. That kept us backing up quite a bit to frame images, sometimes quite a distance. So not just bright daylight, but preferably flat, open spaces are necessary to take advantage of this 3D lens.

Whats noteworthy is that Panasonic was able to deliver 3D imaging in such a small lens. 3D as were used to seeing it, however, is made with eyes that are separated by about 60-70mm (depending on the person), compared to this lenss 10mm separation. This explains the lack of depth that we often perceived on the television.

Vehicles. To my eye, the vehicles are mostly 3D, but without the proper depth. The trees in the background are mostly flat.

Download MPO fileto play on a 3D television.

I happened upon a nice day in mid-winter, and took a few shots of the kids outside, then piled them in the van for a trip to the office where we could see the pictures in 3D. Im blessed with a yard that is big enough to zoom with my feet, and I found myself having to back off as much as 20 or 30 feet to frame images the way Id normally do with a zoom, just to get two small kids in the frame. I also crouched down much of the time to allow for plenty of background in the pictures. I had the sense that I could see some of the 3D effect on the Panasonic GF2s screen after capture, almost certainly an illusion, but it wasnt until we got to the big 50-inch television that the images really popped.

Children. Most shots of the kids were well-defined from the background, but that background tended to curve up rapidly behind them to my perception.

Download MPO fileto play on a 3D television.

Some of them, anyway. Whether an image popped really depended on the lighting and the distance between me, the subject, and the background. In fact, it seems that objects about halfway between the camera and the background stood out the most, an observation made by my oldest daughter. All three kids seemed to enjoy seeing themselves at first, and they fought for the two sets of glasses, with me fighting right along with them so I could have a glimpse, too. After about 10 minutes, though, the interest faded, and the younger boys wandered off to explore the office, while my daughter took the glasses off altogether, only putting them back on to see what I was talking about as I continued to rifle through the images. She was getting nauseated, and the glasses hurt her eyes. To be fair, she said she was nauseated before we got there, and it turned out she had a stomach flu after all. But the boys also said the glasses bothered their eyes after a few minutes of viewing, and when their sister freed up her glasses, they were not interested in coming back to see more (my youngest son refuses to watch 3D movies at the theater, so its impressive that this Panasonic TV held him as long as it did).

Publisher Dave (whos notoriously sensitive to motion sickness) also reported some queasiness when viewing 3-D images. He thinks its caused by the way the scene position appears to shift when you move your head. If you dont easily become seasick or just dont move your head much while viewing, this may not be a problem for you.

Depth. This shot of the small truck should show what I mean with the lack of depth going back when viewed in 3D.

Download MPO fileto play on a 3D television.

My eyes were slightly bothered by viewing the images at first, but I think I could get used to the glasses and TV. I was surprised that you could still see 3D fairly well as much as 45 degrees off-axis, unlike the passive 3D glasses Ive used in the past. Each of the lab viewers experienced more or less 3D effect depending on the person. People with a very dominant eye might see no effect at all. I tended to see more than most, but I noticed a limitation: backgrounds often seemed to wrap back up toward the camera, rather than continuing cleanly back as I knew they should. As a result, you get the effect of paper cutouts against a steeply sloping background, rather than full depth. The 3D experts around me say its likely the small 10-millimeter separation between the lenses that causes the perceived compression, not so much the 65mm-equivalent lens. Another flaw in the viewing experience was that dark objects against a light background tended to show ghost images overlaying the dark portions, especially noticeable in people and tree trunks. This is likely the result of the glasses not completely blocking light when in the off state: Some of the other eyes image leaks through, making the ghost images appear where a dark foreground object is next to a light one or vice versa.

The images were realistic enough that I found myself shifting my head to see if I could see more of a scene by moving to peek around a real opening into 3D space. When you do that, though, the 3D background just appears to float, unmoving, behind the foreground objects, an odd, somewhat unsettling phenomenon that caused a couple of viewers queasiness.

Lab shot. Heres a tighter-than-usual shot of the INB indoor test target that should also show some depth.

Download MPO fileto play on a 3D television.

Since we had the big, beautiful Panasonic 3D TV in-house, we also viewed a few images from the Sony NEX-3 made with the 3D Sweep Panorama function, as these are also MPO files. Results were good, with perhaps a bit more depth. But because the images are stitched from multiple images, it was really obvious where the stitching errors were made, because things like bunches of trees, which are considerably more difficult to stitch, would stand out as not conforming to the 3D world; one tree even popped out from the background to appear to be in front of the trees it was most certainly behind.

While I enjoyed looking at the 3D images for the novelty, I dont think its something Id do very often. Given how little time the kids looked at it, Im sure I wont be an early adopter of the technology, even though the television Panasonic sent us currently sells for about as much as a 2D 50-inch TV cost last year: around US$1,050 at current street prices. (And the TC-P50GT25 is a very, very good 2D TV as well, with great color, excellent dynamic range, and very fast refresh.) The glasses are about US$100 per pair. Those already invested in 3D, be it for gaming or movie viewing, will likely find the US$250 lens an inexpensive way to enjoy the hardware they already have, provided they also already have a Panasonic G2, GF2, or GH2. (Those same users might also see it as additional reason to buy into the whole Panasonic Micro Four Thirds camera lineup as a whole.)

Still, Im glad I have some photos of the kids playing in 3D, because someday the technology may be as ubiquitous as the once-futuristic flat panels are today. Indeed, some of what we saw at CES 2011, especially glasses-free 3D, made even the most skeptical 3D doubters among us start to wonder. Perhaps instead of continued confinement to the iconic reels of the 72-year-old Viewmaster stereoscopic viewer, 3D might finally stick around, what with electronic capture and electronic display technology finally becoming the mainstream method of image creation and consumption. Meanwhile, if you want to start capturing 3D now, the Panasonic 3D lens is available for current or future G2, GF2, or GH2 shooters at a reasonable price.

3D that can be used with new generation Panasonic m43 cameras

can only be used in bright light, presently does not support videos, for only a bit more can purchase a dedicated 3D camera from Fujifilm that produces better stills and video as well

This is a limited review based on some initial impressions. I used the 3D with my Pansonic GH2, and it was fun getting some 3D shots and then viewing them on my 3D television. However, so many of my outdoor daytime shots came out too dark to be useful, even when the auto ISO function set the ISO at 1600; some of these shots were taken in the shade though so I would conclude, as does the review posted by slrgear, that the lens can only be used effectively in bright light.

Although it is nice to have a 3D lens available for my GH2, I also recently purchased the Fujifilm FinePix REAL 3D W3 camera, for not so much more money than the Panny 3D lens alone. The Fujifilm camera image quality seemed better, and I was able to produce satisfactory 3D photos at lower levels of illumination. Moreover, the camera supports HD 3D videos, unlike the Panny 3D lens, which when coupled with one of the Panny cameras that support it, only produces photographs.

One other advantage of the Fujifilm camera is the two lenses are placed about the same distance apart as our eyes, unlike the Panny lens where the lenses are placed close together. I suspect this is why the 3D effect produced by the Fujifilm camera seems (to my eyes) more realistic.

So, although it is good to have a 3D option from Panasonic, for my money I would buy the Fujifilm 3D camera over the Panny lens, and use the m43 cameras for 2D shots only.

Imaging Resource © 1998 – 2018. Material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted or otherwise used without the prior written consent of The Imaging Resource.

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Bottom Line:The completely wire-free Jam Ultra earphones offer booming bass for an affordable price, but there are far better-sounding options in the true wireless realm.

Bottom Line:The Philips Fidelio B5 4.1 soundbar system delivers strong bass response you can tune to your liking, as well as wireless rear satellites that double as portable speakers.

Bottom Line:The Philips Fidelio B5 4.1 soundbar system delivers strong bass response you can tune to your liking, as well as wireless rear satellites that double as portable speakers.

Bottom Line:If you like an on-ear fit and big bass response for your workouts, the wireless Plantronics BackBeat Fit 500 headphones get just about everything right.

Bottom Line:If you like an on-ear fit and big bass response for your workouts, the wireless Plantronics BackBeat Fit 500 headphones get just about everything right.

Bottom Line:The mirrorless Canon EOS M100 delivers SLR image quality and fast autofocus in a compact build with a touch LCD that makes it easy for anyone to use.

Bottom Line:The mirrorless Canon EOS M100 delivers SLR image quality and fast autofocus in a compact build with a touch LCD that makes it easy for anyone to use.

Bottom Line:The YI Horizon VR180 is one of the first cameras to support Googles VR180 platform, but we dont know much about it yet.

Bottom Line:The YI Horizon VR180 is one of the first cameras to support Googles VR180 platform, but we dont know much about it yet.

Bottom Line:The Que Q3E are exercise-focused Bluetooth earphones that deliver solid audio from an unexciting design.

Bottom Line:The Que Q3E are exercise-focused Bluetooth earphones that deliver solid audio from an unexciting design.

Bottom Line:If youve never played Okami, or are looking to replay this classic, this HD rerelease offers a grand experience for the PC.

Bottom Line:If youve never played Okami, or are looking to replay this classic, this HD rerelease offers a grand experience for the PC.

Bottom Line:The wire-free Erato Verse earphones sound great but fumble when it comes to on-ear controls.

Bottom Line:The wire-free Erato Verse earphones sound great but fumble when it comes to on-ear controls.

Bottom Line:The Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5S is a new version of the GH5 with a 10.2MP sensor thats built for 4K video and native dual ISO to curb noise when shooting in dim light.

Bottom Line:The Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5S is a new version of the GH5 with a 10.2MP sensor thats built for 4K video and native dual ISO to curb noise when shooting in dim light.

Bottom Line:The Jam Rhythm speaker uses Wi-Fi to stream music and supports Amazon Alexa voice commands through an app. But it delivers subpar audio performance, even for the under-$100 price.

Bottom Line:The Jam Rhythm speaker uses Wi-Fi to stream music and supports Amazon Alexa voice commands through an app. But it delivers subpar audio performance, even for the under-$100 price.

Bottom Line:The Rylo camera captures 360-degree video, but with the intent of cropping and displaying it in a traditional manner. Its a great concept, but it needs more pixels to deliver clear results.

Bottom Line:The Rylo camera captures 360-degree video, but with the intent of cropping and displaying it in a traditional manner. Its a great concept, but it needs more pixels to deliver clear results.

Bottom Line:The gym-friendly JLab Epic Sport Wireless earphones offer solid audio with variable EQ modes and a very secure fit.

Bottom Line:The gym-friendly JLab Epic Sport Wireless earphones offer solid audio with variable EQ modes and a very secure fit.

Bottom Line:The Insta360 Nano S adds 4K 360-degree video to your iPhone, complete with support for live streaming and chat.

Bottom Line:The Insta360 Nano S adds 4K 360-degree video to your iPhone, complete with support for live streaming and chat.

Bottom Line:More than just a camera to keep an eye on your little one, the Nanit Sleep System is a smart baby monitor that lets you track sleep patterns and other useful data in a companion app.

Bottom Line:More than just a camera to keep an eye on your little one, the Nanit Sleep System is a smart baby monitor that lets you track sleep patterns and other useful data in a companion app.

Bottom Line:The JBL Link 10 smart speaker offers Google Assistant voice control in a portable, rugged, and relatively affordable package.

Bottom Line:The JBL Link 10 smart speaker offers Google Assistant voice control in a portable, rugged, and relatively affordable package.

Bottom Line:The Element Roku TV has just average picture quality, but gets you a 50-inch screen with access to plenty of streaming services for under $400.

Bottom Line:The Element Roku TV has just average picture quality, but gets you a 50-inch screen with access to plenty of streaming services for under $400.

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XK X100 3D Micro Quad Review – Gearbest

Any issues with heat? How many flights since you mummified it?

Been lots of rain + winds here lately, not to mention the mosquitoes later in the evening, so time to fly has been limited.

maybe 30+ No heat issues at all. Motors cool, board too. Crashed a lot without problems. Having problems getting to do 360 flips/rolls ….bcos cant do inverted with those props, just my timing I think.

Running higher rated lipos , the eachine 240mah 45c work well / 380mah 25c very good – 450mah 30c good flight time, not as punchy, due to the battery weight.

Using the Hubsan props, I find those perform the best, with regards to stability and punch-outs.

i found that the stock battery just does not have enough. now tried a 450 ma that came with xk k110 heli and that thing is great. removed the canopy and battery holder to remove a little weight and tied it in with fish line but this thing supports the battery well. next is to get some better rotors blades.

Finally got thru reading this thread in its entirety. Dont know why I didnt fond it when I searched XK X100 but Flux pointed me in the right direction and he I am. Ive got my X251 sitting in a box waiting for me to get the X100 running right and learn 3g. What I had posted in one of the other, short X100 threads and the X251 thread-

Okay, Ive hammered my second X100 enough trying to get to 3G (first is somewhere in my neighbors tree and hopefully found when the leaves come off to salvage what I can) . Ive worked the Gyro down to 42 and can fly it around pretty fluidly with no problem. I have the D/R set to 25/25/90 on low and 50/50/100 on high, expo on 5/5/55 high or low (dont even know why), Tcurve 0/25/55/80/100 both ways but Ive messed with those settings a lot. Pcurve (does it have any effect on quads, I think someone posted that it doesnt?) 0/30/4575/100 and and Gyro at 42.

With these settings it whips around pretty good. When I flip the Gear switch so the Gyro hits 41 or even if I just change the Gyro with the Gear switch up, I crash immediately. Well, not every time. sometime I get it in the air enough to crash it violently. Ive noticed that it seems the motors cut out momentarily, I probably push up on the throttle at that moment and its heading for the crash.

I did hold the copter with my fingers and the motors didnt cut out so I feel it must be something Im doing but I cant figure out what.

Anybody have any suggestions before Im flying my third and ordering my 4th?.

Im a newbie to anything past toy grade so a lot of the terminology is slowly growing on me. What Id like to be able to do is fly 3g without having to worry about 3D, if thats possible. From some of the comments, I believe it is but not sure what settings get me there. Thats what I was attempting when I ran into the snag of dropping the Gyro setting to below 42 and not being able to get it in the air for more than a split second.

Finally got thru reading this thread in its entirety. Dont know why I didnt fond it when I searched XK X100 but Flux pointed me in the right direction and he I am. Ive got my X251 sitting in a box waiting for me to get the X100 running right and learn 3g. What I had posted in one of the other, short X100 threads and the X251 thread-

Okay, Ive hammered my second X100 enough trying to get to 3G (first is somewhere in my neighbors tree and hopefully found when the leaves come off to salvage what I can) . Ive worked the Gyro down to 42 and can fly it around pretty fluidly with no problem. I have the D/R set to 25/25/90 on low and 50/50/100 on high, expo on 5/5/55 high or low (dont even know why), Tcurve 0/25/55/80/100 both ways but Ive messed with those settings a lot. Pcurve (does it have any effect on quads, I think someone posted that it doesnt?) 0/30/4575/100 and and Gyro at 42.

With these settings it whips around pretty good. When I flip the Gear switch so the Gyro hits 41 or even if I just change the Gyro with the Gear switch up, I crash immediately. Well, not every time. sometime I get it in the air enough to crash it violently. Ive noticed that it seems the motors cut out momentarily, I probably push up on the throttle at that moment and its heading for the crash.

I did hold the copter with my fingers and the motors didnt cut out so I feel it must be something Im doing but I cant figure out what.

Anybody have any suggestions before Im flying my third and ordering my 4th?.

Im a newbie to anything past toy grade so a lot of the terminology is slowly growing on me. What Id like to be able to do is fly 3g without having to worry about 3D, if thats possible. From some of the comments, I believe it is but not sure what settings get me there. Thats what I was attempting when I ran into the snag of dropping the Gyro setting to below 42 and not being able to get it in the air for more than a split second.

flying 3d mode is a complelty different beast, its exactly the same as flying an rc heli copter (well a proper one that has no self leveling) you cannot hammer on the controls like you can in self leveling modes. any input translates to a rotational rotate telling it to rotate on that axis at that rate. let go and it then holds that angle.

This causes big issues for beginners because they are so used to holding th controls. so they use too much, and then have to compensate and get in a loop off being completly behind what is happening making bigger and bigger out of sync corrections.

im not sure why they have a compleltya djustable gyro because its not needed it just causes more issues.

After a few crashes I cant get it to spool up consistently, after inserting and then connecting the battery it binds but the green lights dont come on and there is no throttle.

Strangely, sometimes, if I connect the battery before inserting it I can get it to work. Even then it has a chance of flipping over mid flight. Eventually it just refuses to go green at all and I give up and fly the k110/k120 instead

Any thoughts while I wait on a new BNF on the slow boat?

Once your new one breaks too, and it will, give up on this quad. The integrated frame design is a major flaw.

Once your new one breaks too, and it will, give up on this quad. The integrated frame design is a major flaw.

I take that to mean it is dead, dead …

I take that to mean it is dead, dead …

Quite likely, yes, I am afraid so. You could try having a look over the board to see if you can repair any broken traces, but even if you succeed, it probably wont last long.

+ on that. The circuit traces are on the flexible frame and can and do crack. I strengthened mine with splints and have not had any problems. Except with the battery connector .If you can locate the cracks . Try flexing the board with battery in to make if fail and locate crack .then can repair or just beef up the new frame .

+ on that. The circuit traces are on the flexible frame and can and do crack. I strengthened mine with splints and have not had any problems. Except with the battery connector .If you can locate the cracks . Try flexing the board with battery in to make if fail and locate crack .then can repair or just beef up the new frame .

MICRON3DP

MICRON3DP is the first company to introduce high resolution molten Glass 3D Printing, thereby innovating a new way of manufacturing high-precision glass parts.

Pioneering High Resolution Multicolor Molten Glass 3D Printing.

MICRON3DP Ltd is the first company to introduce high resolution molten glass 3D Printing, thereby innovating a new way of manufacturing glass parts.

3D Micro-fabrication Processes A Review

3D Micro-fabrication Processes: A Review

DOI: 10.1049/ic:20060471 Source:IEEE Xplore

Conference:Conference: MEMS Sensors and Actuators, 2006. The Institution of Engineering and Technology Seminar on

We review the state of the art in micro-scale fabrication processes capable of producing three-dimensional parts and features. Their number and heterogeneity makes an exhaustive review impossible. We selected processes according to how well they satisfied the following criteria. They should ideally have made the leap from research laboratory to industry or appear likely to do so in the near- to mid-term. Resolution should be high. Throughput should be high. The variety of materials from which parts can be fabricated should be large. Finally, constraints on the geometries of parts that can be realized should be few. The review is based on the literature in the field. We have done our best to track down and include references to as many published reviews of technologies and technology families within our broad scope, though we have been a little disappointed not to find more.

Do you want toread the restof thisconference paper?

…A number of manufacturing routes have been developed for micro-structuring mould inserts for micro-moulding in general. Such manufacturing routes produce micro-structures with different properties and limitations in terms of produced geometry, minimum dimensions, maximum aspect ratios, resolution, surface roughness and typical insert materials.Table 3 summarizes basic properties for common micro-manufacturing techniques compiled from different sources94959697

. The techniques shown in table 3 are generally used for producing moulds for different micromoulding process, such as IM and HE….

A review of micro-powder injection moulding as a microfabrication technique

Fabrication of three-dimensional metallic microcomponents in fused silica by a femtosecond laser & micromoulding (FLM) method

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Fabrication of three-dimensional metallic microcomponents in fused silica by a femtosecond laser & m…

Three-dimensional (3D) metallic microdevices are essential for the micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and microfluidic applications. In this paper, a femtosecond laser based micromoulding (FLM) method is employed to fabricate 3D metallic conductive microcomponents in fused silica. 3D microcavities/ microchannels in fused silica, which are served as the molds of metallic microcomponents,…[Show full abstract]

How To Build Your Own Moth Trap: step by step instructions on how to build a low cost moth trap

The design of moth trap in this book is the result of several years experimentation with a range of materials and light sources. None of the experiments was ever a complete failure, but the final design using 0.75W UV LEDs works about as well as established trap designs using an 8W actinic tube. These LED traps can be powered using AA batteries of the correct type and are lightweight, so can…[Show full abstract]

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Circuit World Impact Factor: 0.50

This paper explores the use of models of substrate behaviour to examine the wireability constraints on PCBs due to signal layers and buried and through vias. The importance of product scale as a factor affecting technology choice is examined in detail, and the factors that decide the need for multi-layer construction and buried and through vias are discussed. Large PCB layouts are constrained…[Show full abstract]

Understanding models of substrate behaviour for the routing of high I/O packages

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Data provided are for informational purposes only. Although carefully collected, accuracy cannot be guaranteed. Publisher conditions are provided by RoMEO. Differing provisions from the publishers actual policy or licence agreement may be applicable.

This publication is from a journal that may support self archiving.

Micro Drone 30 shoots HD video stabilized by a mini-robotic gimbal

The Micro Drone 3.0 shoots video at 720×1280 at 30 fps stabilized by what the company claims to be the worlds smallest gimbal

Small, palm-sized quadcopters have a certain appeal within the increasingly cramped drone market. Theyre portable, low-risk and are generally an inexpensive way for rookie pilots to learn the ropes. But these pint-sized robots have their shortcomings. In developing its new Micro Drone 3.0, UK company Extreme Fliers has set out to work features typically found in high-end drones into a smaller package, namely HD video stabilized by a tiny gimbal and compatibility with Google cardboard VR for first-person view flying.

Extreme Fliers is no stranger to the drone game. Its preceding Micro Drone 2.0 was designed as a low-cost beginner quadcopter capable of grabbing acceptable captures at 640p. But the latest iteration is promising quite a bit more.

Launched today on Indiegogo, the Micro Drone 3.0 shoots video at 720×1280 at 30 fps stabilized by what the company claims to be the worlds smallest gimbal. The palm-sizedZanodrone we covered late last year also shoots at 720p and promises promises digital image stabilization, like that seen in more expensiveParrot Bepop. But as for steadying shots by way of minuscule robotic arms, the Micro Drone 3.0 appears to be flying solo.

The available sample footage looks to be halfway decent, but it will be interesting to see how it handles various lighting conditions and how steady the shots remain in practice. To aid these ambitions further, the company has developed special algorithms aimed at allowing the 71 g (2.5 oz) drone to handle rough winds of up to 45 km/h (28 mph).

The Micro Drone 3.0 can be controlled with a radio controller or an iOS or Android device by way of a companion app. The handy thing here is that it can stream video to the screen of the device, a feature thats typical of more expensive models but not always present in micro drones (with afew exceptions). But looking to really tap into the first-person view flying phenomenon, which has catalyzed adrone racing movement, the Micro Drone 3.0 is designed to work with Google Cardboard VR. Users can therefore slap on a headset to better immerse themselves in the experience.

And for those looking to pimp out their rides, theres also the option of 3D printing your own custom frames. Early backers receive a selection of ready-to-print CAD files such as wasps or a dragons, while the company promises to bring out new 3D printable accessories every month. Or you could of course create your own.

Flight time is eight minutes with the battery recharged via USB, while video can be stored on an onboard micro SD card. The drone measures 50 mm (1.96 in) in height and 145 mm (5.7 in) in diameter. Early pledges of US$125 are available at the time of writing, with shipping slated for November if the campaign runs as planned.

You can see the drone in action in the promotional video below.

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$300 Micro 3D Printer Earns Big on Kickstarter

The lightweight, USB-compatible desktop device has sold out of the very limited special price $200 and $250 bundles.

PCMag reviews productsindependently, but we may earn affiliate commissions from buying links on this page.Terms of use.

M3D launched itsMicro 3D printer projecton Kickstarter today, and has already surpassed its $50,000 goaland then some.

The numbers continue to tick up as more than 1,300 backers have already contributed almost $330,000 as of press time. And there are still 29 days to go.

Advertised as the first truly consumer 3D printer,the Microis certainly more affordable than any of its big-business counterparts. The lightweight, USB-compatible desktop device, which can be used with any Windows, Mac, or Linux system, has sold out of $200 and $250 bundles, which include the Micro at a very limited special price (shipping not included), as well as one filament spool.

The still-available $300, $600-plus, and $900-plus reward packages also earn you a first-batch printer on the cheap. Comparatively, Brooklyn-based MakerBot isnow taking pre-ordersfor its compact Replicator Mini, with a price tag of $1,375.

Weve built The Micro with reliability, consistency, and accessibility in mind, the M3D team wrote on Kickstarter. Built for everyone from novice users to experts, the device include a sensor and feedback system for auto-leveling and calibration; youll never have to adjust the printer, even after building an entire scale model of the Death Star.

Bring your ideas to life, turn them into businesses, educate, learn, personalize products, make toys, make jewelry, start a curriculum, run a modern workshop, and unleash your creativity, the team said. The power of creation is yours!

The space-efficient, portable, quiet 3D printer comes in five colorssilver, black, blue, red/orange, and greenand promises the lowest power consumption of any 3D printer on the market. Already own a 3D printer, or just have spools of filament lying around? The Micro supports various materials, including ABS, PLA, and Nylon, among others. Likewise, M3Ds filament is compatible with other printers.

Were ready for production and really need your support to ramp up assembly to get printers to you as early as possible, the Kickstarter page said.

The Maryland-based team has been prepping for more than a year, and now, by pre-ordering the Micro printer, youll help us reach our last crucial milestone: purchasing the injection molds that will provide us with high-quality, high-volume 3D printer parts we need.

Unless otherwise noted, all Micro 3D Printer rewards come with the M3D software, instruction manual, USB cable, country-specific power adapter, and one Micro filament spool.

Still unclaimed, M3Ds big-spender rewards include a signed sketch of the original design ($2,000+), a custom-colored printer ($5,000+), and a tour of the M3D offices and lunch with the team ($10,000+). The Kickstarter project closes on May 7.

For more, see3D Printing: What You Need to Know. And check out some of our best shots from the 2014 Inside 3D Printing show in the slideshow above.

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Stephanie began as a PCMag reporter in May 2012. She moved to New York City from Frederick, Md., where she worked for four years as a multimedia reporter at the second-largest daily newspaper in Maryland. She interned at Baltimore magazine and graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania (in the town of Indiana, in the state of Pennsylvania) w…See Full Bio

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