MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer Review

11 Best Cheap 3D Printers Under 500$ For Sale of 2018

5 Best 3D Printers Under 1000$ Reviews

20 Best 3D Printers Prices Reviews of 2018

Best Industrial 3D Printers Buying Guide

5 Best Diy 3D Scanners Buyers Guide 2017

15 Best 3D Printer Filament Types: A Buyers Guide

11 Best Cheap 3D Printers Under 500$ For Sale of 2018

5 Best 3D Printers Under 1000$ Reviews

20 Best 3D Printers Prices Reviews of 2018

Best Industrial 3D Printers Buying Guide

5 Best Diy 3D Scanners Buyers Guide 2017

15 Best 3D Printer Filament Types: A Buyers Guide

Home3D Printers MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer Review Price

MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer Review Price

Even ifdesktop 3D printersarent quite as ubiquitous yet as, say, inkjet printers, the truth of the matter is this technology is maturing faster than many expected and there arent quite as many major leaps forward in the 3D printing realm as there have been in the past.

For the most part, 3D printing technology has matured especially in the desktop space and folks understand exactly what they are going to be getting when they decide to go in this direction. At the same time, there are a handful of companies that continue to push the technology a little bit further with every system that they produce, and none are leading the charge quite as hard as the folks at MakerBot.

With the MakerBot Replicator 2X, this company has designed and developed an experimental grade 3D printer designed specifically to push boundaries in the industry. This is an advanced unit that makes the most of some pretty groundbreaking new technology, and gives those that decide to invest in this particular system the opportunity to create in ways that arent possible with your standard 3D printing technology.

If you want to know whether or not the MakerBot Replicator 2X is perfect for you, and whether or not an experimental printer like this one gives you the flexibility that you have been so desperate for, check out the rest of our quick guide.

Check MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer Price at Amazon :

As we touched upon above, the MakerBot Replicator 2X is not your every day, run-of-the-mill 3D printer by any stretch of the imagination.

This is a very much advanced system that makes the most of new and proprietary technology, a system designed to use dual extrusion modules that allow you to craft and create in ways not possible previously (unless you had a skyhigh budget and were willing to purchase commercial grade pieces of equipment).

But even though the MakerBot Replicator 2X is an experimental system, that doesnt mean that the folks at MakerBot made the system overly complicated or complex. No, these engineers have continued to focus on simplifying and streamlining the 3D production printing process as much as possible and the MakerBot Replicator 2X illustrates just how far this company is willing to go to make 3D printing accessible to everyone and anyone.

The very first thing youll notice about the MakerBot Replicator 2X is that it isnt all that much larger than most of your standard 3D printing solutions available on the market today. At the same time, it would be a major mistake for you to think that this unit is a carbon copy of your run-of-the-mill 3D printers it is anything but that!

As we highlighted earlier, this unit makes the most of a dual extrusion module that allows you to print with ABS and dissolvable filament modules manufactured by this company. Having the opportunity to print in both of these different filament materials (at the same time if you want) opens up a lot of creativity and new production solutions that arent available with single extrusion module systems.

On top of that, youre also able to use two interlaced colors when you are 3D printing production materials. You can print precisely with these dual aligned nozzles without any hot swapping of material necessary, and no longer do you have to pause your print project to swap out filament systems for certain parts of your production process.

This opens up some really complex design and intricate/interior supports that can be produced using dissolvable filament. Having the opportunity to scaffold the interior of your project while it is going through the 3D print process and then being able to dissolve that interior scaffold to produce a clean project later down the line is a benefit that cannot be overstated.

The MakerBot Replicator 2X is a true game changer in the world of 3D printing, and you would be making a major mistake to overlook the functionality that these dual extrusion systems bring to the table.

The biggest special feature that the MakerBot Replicator 2X has to offer is most definitely that dual extrusion system that we have spent a bit of time highlighting.

The dissolvable filament system itself is what really separates this unit from the rest of the pack, as you are now able to produce incredibly complex 3D materials without having to waste ABS filament or having to come up with convoluted production processes that kill time and efficiency to get the finished material you are looking for.

Printing at a 100 m layer resolution and optimized for ABS filament overlays, the MakerBot Replicator 2X is a system that is close to a commercial application but available in a desktop style format. You definitely get your moneys worth when you decide to make this your primary 3D printer!

Having the ability to print in two different materials or two different colors at once without pausing or hot swapping is a major benefit of the MakerBot Replicator 2X.

Built in design and engineering software interfaces directly with all other industry-leading solutions and any other product from the MakerBot company.

The 100 m layer resolution guarantees you get a smooth to the such surface without any extra finishing required.

The build volume of the MakerBot Replicator 2X isnt quite as extensive as some of the other 3D printer options available.

The price tag on the MakerBot Replicator 2X is a little bit higher than standard single extruder solutions (though that is to be expected).

Check MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer Price at Amazon :

The MakerBot Replicator 2X is a next generation 3D printing solution that is going to capture a lot of attention from folks that are serious about 3D printing complex projects without sacrificing resolution or the finished product in any way.

While not ideal for absolutely everyone, if you are looking to push the boundaries of what 3D printing solutions are capable of, want to make the most of the amazing versatility this system has to offer, and are willing to tinker with new production processes and materials, the MakerBot Replicator 2X is likely to be right up your alley!

Your email address will not be published.Required fields are marked*

MakerBot Replicator Mini

Please choose from the options above to see price and availability.

CERTAIN CONTENT THAT APPEARS ON THIS SITE COMES FROM AMAZON SERVICES LLC. THIS CONTENT IS PROVIDED AS IS AND IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR REMOVAL AT ANY TIME.

The educational and useful MakerBot Replicator Mini Compact 3D Printer provides easy, affordable and portable 3D printing. Transform a small desk in your home or classroom into an exciting learning center. Educate students how to think, imagine, create, and print in 3D, while preparing them for the jobs of the future. Create opportunities for children to bond with parents, siblings, classmates, and teachers. Choose from over 500,000 free, predesigned, and ready-to-print educational, entertaining, and useful 3D models on MakerBot Thing verse. And its portable take it where you need it.

MakerBot is continually improving and iterating on our hardware, software, and firmware. Our Smart Extruder is more reliable and allows you to create higher quality prints when paired with our latest firmware and software. Get the most from your MakerBot 3D Print by keeping your firmware and software up to date.

Easy, affordable and portable 3D printing Simple. Convenient with everything you need to get started Transforms a small desk in your home or classroom into an exciting learning center Educate students how to think, imagine, create, craft and print in 3D, while preparing them for the jobs of the future Creates opportunities for students to bond with parents, siblings, classmates, and teachers

MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D P…

CTC Bizer Series Dual Nozzle 3D Printer …

MakerBot Smart Extruder, Replicator Mini

Mcdectech-Metal MK8 0.4mm 1.75mm Extrude…

XYZprinting Da Vinci 2.0 Duo 3D Printer

Copyright © 2017. All rights reserved.

3D Printer Sales Center is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to , m, MYHABIT.com, SmallParts.com, or AmazonWireless.com. Amazon, the Amazon logo, AmazonSupply, and the AmazonSupply logo are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates.

MakerBot Announces Their Latest 3D Printer The Replicator

You are about to activate our Facebook Messenger news bot. Once subscribed, the bot will send you a digest of trending stories once a day. You can also customize the types of stories it sends you.

Click on the button below to subscribe and wait for a new Facebook message from the TC Messenger news bot.

Applications are now open for early stage companies to debut in Dubai with TechCrunch

The Europas Its time for a different kind of tech conference

EU Reconsiders Intelligence Cooperation With US After Spying Reports

Forget Calories, New Gadgets Redefine How To Lose Weight And Be Athletic

MakerBot Introduces 3D Photo Booth In Its New York Store, Print Your Face In 3D

Inside The Brand New Makerbot Retail Store

Makerbot Releases The $2,199 Replicator 2.0, A Leap Forward In Home 3D Printing

Droid RAZR MAXX To Launch On January 26th?

A Million Developers On A Million Keyboards: Ecosystems Require R&D Density

MakerBot attempts to embrace the open-source community with its new Labs platform

MakerBot co-founder Bre Pettis buys electronics milling machine maker Other Machine

The OverLord ProPlus is a 3D printer for making really tall objects

MakerBot Announces Their Latest 3D Printer, The Replicator

MakerBot has just announced the MakerBot Replicator, a new, larger replicator that is larger than a breadbox (literally) and supports Dualstrusion 2-color printing.

With a build envelope thats roughly the size of a loaf of bread, The MakerBot Replicator™ gives you the power to go big. Make an entire chess set with the press of a button. Friends, classmates, co-workers, and family will see the things you make and say Wow!

Starting at $1,749, the Replicator comes completely assembled and ready to print. The Replicator is MakerBots first mass market printer and well have a nice hands on this week as CES rolls on.

PR follows and you and pre-orderhere.

anuary 10, 2012 (Brooklyn, NY) MakerBot Industries is excited to announce the launch of its latest product, The MakerBot Replicator™, which will debut at CES in Las Vegas, NV on Tuesday, January 10th. Available in the MakerBot store for pre-order today!

The MakerBot Replicator™ is the ultimate personal 3D printer, with MakerBot Dualstrusion™ (2-color printing) and a bigger printing footprint, giving you the superpower to print things BIG! Assembled in Brooklyn by skilled technicians, the MakerBot Replicator™ is ready within minutes to start printing right out of the box. Starting at $1749, The MakerBot Replicator™ is an affordable, open source 3D printer that is compact enough to sit on your desktop. Want to print in two colors? Choose the Dualstrusion™ option!

With a build envelope thats roughly the size of a loaf of bread, The MakerBot Replicator™ gives you the power to go big. Make an entire chess set with the press of a button. Friends, classmates, co-workers, and family will see the things you make and say Wow!

The MakerBot Replicator™ creates anything you can imagine with the new MakerBot Stepstruder™ MK8, the extruder is the part of the machine that turns raw feedstock, like ABS (what Lego® is made of) or PLA (a biodegradable material made from corn), into the objects you desire. You can order your MakerBot Replicator™ with single or dual MakerBot Stepstruders on it. By choosing the dual extrusion option, youll print with two different colors at the same time. MakerBot Dualstrusion™ unlocks the ability to make beautiful combinations of colors and opens the door to experimenting with with multi-material objects.

The MakerBot Replicator™ is ideal for personalized manufacturing, providing a new way to make the things you want and need. It is also an essential tool for children and students; parents and educators with a MakerBot Replicator™ offer the next generation an opportunity to learn the digital designing skills required to solve the problems of the future. Students with access to a MakerBot have an edge in the future job market. Just like the youth of the 1980s, who had access to computers, children with access to a MakerBot Replicator™ will become the leaders who make a better tomorrow.

The MakerBot Replicator™ is the tool from tomorrow, today. In the two years since the company was founded, the capabilities of a MakerBot have grown from printing cupcake-sized objects in 2009 to printing things as large as an entire loaf of bread today on on the MakerBot Replicator™. MakerBot Industries continues to demonstrate its dedication to putting the tools of creativity into the hands of the those brilliant and bold enough to bring their imagination into the physical world.

MakerBot, a subsidiary of Stratasys, Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS), is a desktop 3D printer maker and was one of the first companies to make 3D printing accessible and affordable. MakerBot now has one of the largest install bases and market shares of the desktop 3D printing industry, with more than80,000 MakerBot Desktop 3D Printers in the world and a robust MakerBot 3D Ecosystem that

DIY3D PrintingHardwareSoftwareOpen Source

Get the top tech stories of the day delivered to your inbox

Get a weekly recap of the biggest tech stories

The latest startup funding announcements

Sequoia Capitals Next Fund Could Be $5 Billion Crunch Report

Ted Chiang is a genius, but hes wrong about Silicon Valley

Theranos gets $100 million in debt financing to carry it through 2018, with some caveats

Girls Who Code gets a Disney Imagineering boost

TechCrunchs Favorite Things of 2017

Meet Molekule, the sleekest air purifier on the market

Amazon acquires connected camera and doorbell startup Blink

Laser-equipped shoes help Parkinsons patients take the next step

LG Officially Unveils The Spectrum With 720p Display And Verizon LTE

Senior Software Engineer, Rails at Mondo Robot (Boulder, CO, United States)

Senior Software Engineer, Front-End at Mondo Robot (Boulder, CO, United States)

Business Development at Equidate (San Francisco, CA, United States)

Data Strategist at Childrens Council (San Francisco, CA, United States)

Digital/Technical Marketer at Manning Publications Co. (Remote)

Latest headlines delivered to you daily

Subscribe to span class=no-mobileSubscribe to /spanThe Daily Crunch

MakerBot Industries Thing-O-Matic 3D Printer

MakerBot Industries Thing-O-Matic 3D Printer

Jump to thenew optimized instructions,intended for educational customers, but great for most users!

Check out the originalAssembly Instructions / User Manual

With the automated build platform it will keep printing and printing.

The automated build platform is a revolution in 3D printing. It allows you to have a print queue; your machine will print objects one after another. This turns your Thing-O-Matic into a little factory that sits on your desktop. Best of all, this is completely automated: you hit print, and the machine does all the work. Want to print 100 butterflies? Easy. Want to print an entire chess set? No problem. Want to start a business selling printed things that youve designed? Awesome. Have the bot do all the work while you design new things.

TheStepstruder MK6will give you thousands of hours of trouble-free printing.

Weve invested many hours into designing, testing, and tweaking the Stepstruder MK6. The result is an extruder that is extremely reliable, and very simple to maintain. The hot end on this extruder is essentially unbreakable and the filament drive system is one of the strongest on the market. Weve successfully run these for thousands of hours. Changing the filament is a breeze with the filament pressure thumb screw. You can even swap the filament while the extruder is running.

The addition of the direct stepper drive allows for new, quality-improving techniques like reversal and compatibility with 1.75mm filament.

The layer alignment is much better which results in nicer prints and higher resolution.

Weve completely overhauled the drive system to give the optimum positioning accuracy. The entire system has been upgraded to sturdy 3/8 diameter linear shafting. This is probably overkill, but you can trust that the axes will be sturdy. Weve also switched to self-aligning, sintered brass bearings. These are very forgiving to DIY assembly and provide a nice, smooth motion on the steel shafts. Weve completely replaced the Z axis with a stepper driven, cantilevered stage. Guided by two of the linear shafts, this completely eliminates any Z wobble and results in nicely aligned layers. Using a high-angle lead screw, we were able to increase the speed of the Z axis from 150mm/minute to 1,000mm/minute. This means the layer changes are almost completely imperceptible.

Connect over USB and hit print the machine will calibrate itself and start printing.

The new electronics have been designed to make the printing experience easier than ever. The Thing-O-Matic connects to your computer via a standard USB cable thanks to a USB chip on the motherboard. Weve also added full endstop support so that you never need to touch the XYZ axes ever again. When you hit print, the machine will automatically home itself, heat up, and begin printing. All you have to do is sit back and relax while your Thing-O-Matic does all the work. Living in the future is awesome. Oh yeah, and the electronics are all inside, so you dont have wires dangling everywhere.

Interface: Serial over USB or print from SD card.

Size: 12 W x 12 D x 16 H (roughly 300mm x 300mm x 400mm)

With Automated Build Platform: 100mm x 100mm x 100mm

With Acrylic Build Platform: 110mm x 110mm x 120mm

Supports up to five stepper drivers (XYZ + A/B)

High current mosfets to drive heated build platform and extruder heater

Thermocouple support for accurate temperature sensing

Power Usage: 500 watts, standard ATX power supply.

Works with both 110v and 220v power.

XY Positioning resolution of 0.02mm (20 microns or 0.0008)

XY Maximum Feedrate of up to 5000mm/minute (roughly 200 IPM)

Z Positioning resolution of 0.005mm (5 microns / or 0.0002)

Z Positioning Feedrate of up to 1000mm/minutes (roughly 40 IPM)

Capable of printing with ABS and PLA

With integrated USB, connection is a breeze.

Both the motherboard and extruder controller now natively support serial over USB, so you can connect to them with any standard USB cable. This makes connecting to them much easier and eliminates the need for a custom cable. This also makes uploading firmware a breeze as the USB allows for automatic reset of the board. Additionally, it has an SD card slot which you can use to run builds from, eliminating the need for a computer. It also has a piezo buzzer which can give you feedback on print status simply by listening.

Beefier MOSFETs to handle bigger loads.

Weve searched high and low to find the best MOSFETs for the extruder controller. The result is an extruder controller that can drive a heated build platform and a MK5 heater block without breaking a sweat. This eliminates the need for a relay, and allows plenty of room for experimenting with driving other things that draw large currents. Weve also added a molex power connector to the extruder controller so that it can safely draw all that power without sending it through the RS485 cable. This has a nice side effect of reducing noise in the comms system. Of course we didnt forget the stepper drivers they can now handle up to 2.8A steppers.

Arduino MEGA brings more memory, more pins.

By using the Arduino MEGA as our base, we have almost doubled the amount of pins available. This has allowed us to do some pretty awesome stuff, with room to spare for you to modify and hack to your hearts content. The motherboard has built in support for up to five stepper drivers. You could control an XYZ platform and two stepper driven extruders. Or you could make a five-axis CNC. The sky is the limit. Weve also added an interface header with 18 I/O pins that can be used to drive an LCD screen and buttons, or to hook up custom electronics that youve designed yourself. Of course the increased FLASH and RAM mean you can write bigger, more complex programs to drive your machine.

Microstepping and thermocouple support up the ante.

Weve upgraded the stepper drivers to handle 1/8-step microstepping. This brings much quieter operation, and improved resolution. Your machine will sound better, and your prints will look nicer. Weve also switched from thermistors to thermocouples for temperature measurement on the extruder. Thermocouples are much more standard, and provide a higher quality reading of temperature. You can be confident that the temperature displayed is actually the temperature of your extruder. They also bring the side benefit of coming pre-assembled and you can simply bolt them right onto the side of your extruder.

The MakerBot Industries Thing-O-Matic isOpen Source Hardwareand is licensed under theGNU GPLv3.

The Thing-O-Matic is a derivative of theMakerBot CupCake CNCwhich was originally designed by MakerBot Industries.

Purchase a Thing-O-Matic from the MakerBot Store.

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed underGNU Free Documentation License.

Click here to edit contents of this page.

Click here to toggle editing of individual sections of the page (if possible). Watch headings for an edit link when available.

Append content without editing the whole page source.

Check out how this page has evolved in the past.

If you want to discuss contents of this page – this is the easiest way to do it.

View and manage file attachments for this page.

A few useful tools to manage this Site.

See pages that link to and include this page.

Change the name (also URL address, possibly the category) of the page.

View wiki source for this page without editing.

View/set parent page (used for creating breadcrumbs and structured layout).

Notify administrators if there is objectionable content in this page.

Something does not work as expected? Find out what you can do.

General Wikidot.com documentation and help section.

Wikidot.com Terms of Service – what you can, what you should not etc.

The Makerbot Replicator+ is still the easiest 3D printer on the market

You are about to activate our Facebook Messenger news bot. Once subscribed, the bot will send you a digest of trending stories once a day. You can also customize the types of stories it sends you.

Click on the button below to subscribe and wait for a new Facebook message from the TC Messenger news bot.

Applications are now open for early stage companies to debut in Dubai with TechCrunch

The tech industry needs to move towards responsible innovation in 2018

Carbon is raising a $200 million Series D to scale 3D printing for manufacturing

Holography-based 3D printing produces objects in seconds instead of hours

Elon Musk really will launch a Tesla Roadster on the first Falcon Heavy rocket

Makeup company Deck of Scarlet moves in at Urban Outfitters

Tesla vehicles to get a major navigation overhaul in 2018

Ink raises $7M to make printing on college campuses less painful

Markforged raises $30 million from industrial investors

XYZPrinting announces a $3,000 full-color 3D printer

Eratos lightweight Verse wireless earbuds deliver solid sound at a good price

Beheld is a new startup that lets you scan, send, and print yourself

Fords Canvas monthly car subscription car service expands to LA

The Makerbot Replicator+ is still the easiest 3D printer on the market

3D printing is in a bit of a doldrums. The novelty has worn off and the limited utility of the technology has been made clear. The bloom is especially off the rose of home 3D printing thanks to slow improvements in the actual technology involved in squirting plastic into clever shapes. There are only so many Yoda heads you can print before the 3D printer starts collecting dust.

But it must be said that behind the scenes things are improving incrementally in the space. Printers are far cheaper than they once were and they are now commonplace in school classrooms. Dreams of a 3D printer on every desk are going to take a bit longer than expected.

That hasnt stopped Makerbot from trying to add a little more utility and ease-of-use to its latest Replicator and they have succeeded. TheReplicator+is essentially the Makerbot refined. It is an instant-on machine with zero learning curve and the software and Thingiverse model collection means that youll always have stuff to print. The resolution is more than acceptable and complex pieces come out beautifully detailed and immediately usable. It costs $1,999, still cheaper than competing professional printers, and its ready to use right out of the box.

The Replicator+ prints PLA plastic, a form of plastic derived from starch. PLA isshown to release fewer potentially harmful vaporsduring printing, a major consideration when choosing a printer for a school or home environment. To use the filament you simply insert a spool into your printer and run the filament through a plastic tube. You then pre-heat the print head a rectangular box that attaches magnetically to the robotic gantry inside the printer and wait for the motor to kick in. You can then lead the filament into the print head and wait until it starts extruding. One button press later and youre done.

The filament spool is hidden inside the printer itself and can be easily replaced with different colors. The Replicator+ only prints in one color unless you swap the filament mid-print.

The new printer software allows you to select and print models fromThingiverseright from your mobile phone, a huge improvement over the previous versions of the app. You can also print your own models from your computer. The desktop version of the app also offers more control over positioning and size.

When the print is done the new print bed allows you to remove objects right from the plastic sheet. This is also a major improvement over previous glass print beds which were covered by a large piece of Kapton tape. This tape often ripped while removing prints, requiring a frequent repairs.

The new print bed is removable and flexible. This means you can bend and twist the bed slightly to get objects off of it and you rarely have to resort to scrapers. The prints I made didnt quite come off without prodding but the fact that I didnt need to replace any tape was a welcome change.

The printer is 30% faster than the previous Makerbot Replicator and there is a 25% larger build area 11.6 by 7.6 by 6.3 inches vs. 9.9 by 7.8 by 5.9 inches. Printing speed is definitely improved in this model but complex projects can still take up to 20 hours to complete.

I printed two test objects on the printer. The first wasa model of a signals from the pulsar PSR B0329+54and the second was atriceratops. The pulsar was a big, complex piece and I wanted to see how long it would take to print about 16 hours on a medium setting while the triceratops had lots of open space that needed to be filled in with support material, another test of the printers ability to create complex objects with lots of detail.

As you can see the printer performed just fine in both counts. My major gripe? The new print head moves much faster than previous models thereby leaving a little trail of plastic from point to point. The result is a hairy model that you can fix with a lighter. These strands simply burn off. If you dont want to deal with that you can also just rub the models down with a little sandpaper or meticulously pull the hairs off. However, this is my primary peeve with the new extruder and software.

The supports under the models were easy to remove about on par with the original Replicator but I found it difficult to pull the models off of the build plate, a fact that Im sure will change over time as the build plate is used more and more. The build quality in general was excellent and the speed was definitely faster although the vagaries of slicing and support structures make it difficult to test the 30% claim outright. All I know is that it took about two hours longer to print that triceratops when I did it on the original Replicator.

MakerBot, a subsidiary of Stratasys, Ltd. (NASDAQ: SSYS), is a desktop 3D printer maker and was one of the first companies to make 3D printing accessible and affordable. MakerBot now has one of the largest install bases and market shares of the desktop 3D printing industry, with more than80,000 MakerBot Desktop 3D Printers in the world and a robust MakerBot 3D Ecosystem that

DIY3D PrintingHardwareSoftwareOpen Source

In terms of physical durability of objects built dont assume you can put any of these pieces in your car engine. I could see potentially using the Makerbot to print, say, a quadcopter propeller or dryer knob (true story) but anything more mission critical or needing structural integrity could be a problem. This 3D printer builds models that you can use to size, test, and envision. It doesnt print finished parts except in very specific cases. Further, even though the layer height is quite nice here, you are still going to get the striations associated with this sort of 3D printing. If you need a perfectly smooth object you can get a Form Labs Form One printer, a product that products structurally coherent and smooth objects. This is a dot matrix printer vs. more expensive laser printers.

Can you have fun and learn from the Replicator+? Absolutely. Is it the best classroom printer by far? Yes. Its easy to use, easy to maintain, and the software is still great. 3D printing and Makerbot has had its ups and downs but pound for pound their printers produce good things for not much money. It will be a long time before 3D printers become commonplace but it will be printers like this one that will soon find places of honor in our classrooms and workshops and the software alone is the gold standard by which all other 3D printers must be judged.

Ted Chiang is a genius, but hes wrong about Silicon Valley

Theranos gets $100 million in debt financing to carry it through 2018, with some caveats

Girls Who Code gets a Disney Imagineering boost

TechCrunchs Favorite Things of 2017

Meet Molekule, the sleekest air purifier on the market

Amazon acquires connected camera and doorbell startup Blink

Laser-equipped shoes help Parkinsons patients take the next step

Get the top tech stories of the day delivered to your inbox

Get a weekly recap of the biggest tech stories

The latest startup funding announcements

Elastic brings order to its product line with Elastic Stack

Senior Software Engineer, Rails at Mondo Robot (Boulder, CO, United States)

Senior Software Engineer, Front-End at Mondo Robot (Boulder, CO, United States)

Business Development at Equidate (San Francisco, CA, United States)

Data Strategist at Childrens Council (San Francisco, CA, United States)

Digital/Technical Marketer at Manning Publications Co. (Remote)

Latest headlines delivered to you daily

Subscribe to span class=no-mobileSubscribe to /spanThe Daily Crunch

3D Printing Supremacy

Pick the Right Filament and Printer

The Best and Most Recommended 3D Printers and Filaments – 2017

3D Printers give us tremendous possibilities – in our home, classroom and industrial area. 3D Printing Supremacy will analize for you all the latest models of 3D Printers and Filaments so you dont have too.

The Best 3D Printers and Filaments Reviews and Comparison Site

The Best of XYZprinting What are Top Models for 2016

XYZprinting 3D Printers is the brand renowned for easy installation and configuration, making the prototyping and modelling jobs very easy as well as cost-effective and on of best 3d printers.

Best Hatchbox Filaments Review for 2016

When it comes to 3D printing material, you must get the best available in market. Some of the brilliant 3D Printing filaments are manufactured by Hatchbox, known for innovation and application of top technology in manufacturing 3D printer filaments.

The Best of MakerBot Filament Top Rated for 2016

These filaments have gained excellence, in comparison to the similar products by other brands, by providing best print performance, consistency and overall quality output to the 3D print jobs.

MakerGear M2FlashForge Creator ProLulzBot TAZ 6FlashForge FinderXYZprinting da Vinci 1.0… These are the ones models that have passed our best opinion for 3D Printers. We have also analyzed the top 3D Filaments that will give you hassle free printouts, with bright colors and warp free… Please free to comment to the articles on this website…

Latest news from the 3D Printing Industry Provided by:

3D Printer Certification MakerBot

Learn how to use the MakerBot 3D printers in our MakerLab. This session will cover how to change filament, find objects to 3D print, set up your print job and troubleshoot the printers. During the class, each participant can choose a sample object to print from several preselected projects. Please note that due to limited print time during classes, we will be unable to print other things. After attending this class, you will be able to reserve time on the MakerBot printers to print your own projects.

The MakerLab has three MakerBot printers: the MakerBot Replicator 5th Gen, Mini and Replicator 2X.

Participants of all ages are welcome to attend the class, but those under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

We recently acquired a Lulzbot Mini printer thanks to a generous donor. If you are interested in learning this machine, please check theMakerLab calendarfor upcoming Lulzbot Mini 3D Printer Training.

An event every week that begins at 4:00pm on Wednesday, repeating until May 30, 2018

An event every week that begins at 4:00pm on Wednesday, repeating until May 30, 2018

An event every week that begins at 4:00pm on Wednesday, repeating until May 30, 2018

New Canaan,CT06840United States+ Google MapPhone:2035945003Try these books from our collection:3D PrintingONeill, Terence

As they become more common and more powerful, 3D printers are allowing makers everywhere to bring their ideas to life. Readers will discover new processes, integrate visual information with text, and learn technical word meanings as they discover how 3D printers work and how makers are using them today. They will also learn how to create their own inventions from 3D computer models.–Publishers web site.

As they become more common and more powerful, 3D printers are allowing makers everywhere to bring their ideas to life. Readers will discover new processes, integrate visual information with text, and learn technical word meanings as they discover how 3D printers work and how makers are using them today. They will also learn how to create their own inventions from 3D computer models.–Publishers web site.

Provides information on using the MakerBot printer to create a wide variety of 3D objects.

Provides information on using the MakerBot printer to create a wide variety of 3D objects.

Provides information about 3-D printers while offering step-by-step instructions for three-dimensional printer projects, including a key chain and a jumping frog.

Presents over two dozen simple science activities using food, common household items, water, and the outdoors.

Makerbot Replicator 2 Desktop Printer – Used

Canadas Largest & Most Experienced MakerBot Distributor………………….(306) 867-9888

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Makerbot Replicator 2 Desktop Printer – Used

Makerbot Replicator 2 Desktop Printer – Used

Makerbot Replicator 2 Desktop Printer – Used

This is a used MakerBot Replicator 2.

This printer will come with 30 days of warranty through Thor 3D.

Contact Thor 3D for additional Details on this 3D printer.

Professional-quality prototypes. Highly complex models. Attractive pieces of art. With the new MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer- you can expect these and more.

On a 3D printer- quality is often measured by the height of each layer- with smaller layers meaning higher resolution. Weve dropped the default layer height all the way down to 100 microns- giving you smooth surfaces without any post-production. Make things youre proud to demo to your boss or show off to your family. Discover the look and feel of the new standard in desktop 3D printing.

A new standard in Desktop 3D Printing demands a build volume thats bigger in all three dimensions. The MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer has a build volume of 410 cubic inches- so you can think and build bigger than ever. Thats 37% more volume than the original MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printer that you can use to make big things or entire multi-part projects at one time. Combined with our speed improvements- you now get much more done in much less time.

Finally a desktop 3D printer made for multitasking. Now you can do your highest quality work and do a favor to the environment- too. Weve adapted the MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer to work perfectly with PLA- the renewable bioplastic that sticks to the platform reliably with practically no peeling- curling- sliding or shrinking.With MakerBot PLA Filament you will make professional-quality prototypes and huge pieces with dimensional stability- meaning that what you design is what you get. Whats more- you will use 32% less energy than building with ABS plastic. Find out why MakerBot PLA Filament helps us set a standard in desktop 3D printing.

MakerBot Replicator Mini+ is the 3D printer you want but its not cheap

Mashable Choicehighlights the best of everything we cover, have experienced first-hand and would recommend to others.

3D printing has not turned into the consumer revolution everyone expected. If you need proof, just look at standard-bearer MakerBot, a company conceived to bring 3D printing to the masses that is now narrowing its focus considerably to business and education.

One of the reasons it never quite took off is because 3D printing is more complicated, frustrating and messier than most of us were led to believe. Its slow, confusing and how many oddball, rough-hewn tchotchkies does anyone need anyway?

This is what its like to set up a@makerbotReplicator Mini+ 3D printer. Next, I /s8w8oHCGTq

Lance Ulanoff (@LanceUlanoff)October 9, 2016

Worse yet, so-called affordable 3D printers have not made the process any easier. Last year, I tried out a$399 Mod-T. While gorgeously designed, the wireless setup was a bust and, even when connected to a computer, it failed to properly print a single model. It was an utter failure.

MakerBot has a better rep (though the Replicator 2 we had in the office was often in need of repair) which is why I was excited to try thebrand newMakerBot Replicator Mini+. Its virtually the same size as the last Mini (which is already smaller and, to my mind, more manageable that the Replicator 2), but, according to MakerBot, is faster, quieter and can handle larger prints.

I got one in the office so I could put these claims to the test.

The key to making 3D printing accessible to average humans is two-fold. First, you need to shield them completely from the act of 3D model creation. Most of us are not designers and even fewer people can handle a CAD program. Secondly, the road from set-up to printing your first model has to be as short and bump-free as possible.

With the exception of a handful of minor bumps in the road, MakerBot Replicator Mini+ succeeds on both these fronts.

The good news starts with the out-of-the-box experience. In the box is the printer, a roll of gray PLA printing filament, the print head (or extruder), a power cord and a USB cable to connect to a PC. The 11.3-inch long by 13.8-inch wide by 15-inch tall, 20-pound MakerBot Replicator Mini+ arrives mostly assembled. Theres some packing material to remove from parts that will move during the printing process and you do have to attach both the extruder and the printing plate. I loved that both snap in place with magnets so theres no confusion about how to attach them. The printer uses a standard AC power cable, has a power switch on the side and a status button on the front.

Theres also a quick start sheet that guides you through the initial set-up, before you switch over to the very effective MakerBot mobile app. Oddly, the one piece of packing material the instructions neglected to tell me to remove (and that I totally missed) was an orange strip of tape covering the extruder tip. I didnt notice it until I was trying to load in my filament for the first time, which entailed heating up that printing tip and me almost accidentally burning through the tape.

And removed. It slides in and stays in place with magnets.

After the initial unpacking, the setup switches to the MakerBot mobile app. It took me step-by-step through the process, though I initially stumbled on the Wi-Fi connectivity. Like many Wi-Fi connected devices, it wanted me to start by connecting my phone directly to the printer as if it was a Wi-Fi hot spot. The problem was, I couldnt get the printer into the connecting mode. It took me a few tries at pressing the status button for three seconds to get it blinking blue. Once I did, the printers Wi-Fi SSID showed up on my iPhone and I was able to move forward.

The biggest problem I had during setup, though, was that, despite all the careful guidance, the mobile app dropped the ball on showing me exactly how to feed the filament into the extruder a crucial step. It just told me to load the filament and, when I didnt load it properly, it didnt warn me with an error message and my very first print was just air.

I eventually found some filament loading guidance under utilities and then I was good to go.

Its important to note that during my entire setup and subsequent print jobs, I never connected the Replicator Mini+ to a PC. Instead, I was able to do virtually everything through the mobile app.

The built-in VGA camera lets you keep track of your print job from anywhere int he world.

Using the app, I selected the print object, started printing and visually monitored the print progress through the app (at any time I could pause or cancel the job). The last part is made possible via the printers built-in VGA web cam, which gives me a real-time view of the print job.

During my tests, MakerBots Thingverse 3D print cloud service was having technical issues and failed to properly slice the model and send it to the printer. Eventually, I went on to theThingverse website, logged in, found some free models and added them to my library. They immediately appeared within the app and I was able to successfully start my first print job.

At the left, some of your mobile app setting choices. The subsequent two screens show how you can monitor and control the print job.

Its always a good idea to check how long the model designers say their 3D object is going to take to print, something I failed to do on my first successful run.

Since its October, I chose a roughly 4-inch tall grim reaper model (the printer has a max capacity of about 4 inches long by 5 inches wide by 5 inches tall). It didnt look that complex and it came in three pieces so I could print the main body first and then his scythe and lamp separately. At default resolution of 100 microns, the body took almost five hours to print. Id also advise you to check the size of your objects before printing. The Mini+ will try to automatically scale objects to fit in its print area. When I tried to print a Frankensteins monster head that was too big for the printer, it scaled it down to the size of a pea. So, yes, it printed the head, but I needed a magnifying glass to see its features. (MakerBot later told me that the printer will only scale objects just enough to fit in the print area. Apparently this was just a small print file that I was supposed to somehow scale up.)

This is what its like to print with a@makerbotReplicator Mini+ 3D printer. Can you guess what it is before it m/WdFRH546Ci

Lance Ulanoff (@LanceUlanoff)October 9, 2016

As for the noise, multiple people came into my office to ask me what kind of weird synth, techno music I was playing. The printer delivers an endless stream of semi-tuneful sounds as it prints. If this is quieter operation, I shudder to think what the original Mini sounded like. The new printer is not exactly loud, but it never stops and made me wish I hadnt set the printer up right next to where I sit. Eventually, I got used to it, but educators might think twice about putting this printer in a classroom full of distractible students.

The side of the print is home to the power switch and USB port, which I never used.

This is the removable extruder (or print head).

When the MakerBot Replicator Mini+ finished its print job, I was away from my desk and I got a notification on my iPhone. When I checked the webcam, I could see the little grim reaper standing there.

I returned to my desk, slid out the print plate and proceeded to try to pry the model off of it. MakerBot redesigned the grip surface so that prints no longer curl up and off the plate during printing. I did not apply blue tape before starting the print job because MakerBot said we dont need it anymore. It was, though, not easy to get the 3D print off. I actually gave the small plate a little twist to try to loosen its grip on the reaper. The much larger and more expensive new Replicator+ comes with a flexible plate that makes it easy to twist it until the 3D print pops off.

The output from the MakerBot Replicator Mini+ is pretty impressive.

Of course, this reapers main body took 5 hours to print.

The print looked good, though, I would sand it down if I wanted it to look more polished. It actually printed on its own little detachable base to give the bottom a more finished look.

Later, when I printed both the scythe and lamp (in a few minutes instead of hours, thank goodness), they, too, printed on small, removable platforms.

The successful 3D printing of my little scary reaper only made me want to try printing some more, but it also proved something Ive long suspected, a good, reliable 3D printer is going to cost you. Theres the cost of the printer, $1,299 ($999 for a limited time) and the filament, $48 a roll. This is an expensive hobby, but could be cost-effective for educators and small businesses. Plus, you can split print jobs into multiple printers, all through a single mobile app installation.

I still dont think 3D printing is for everyone, but if youre ready to try, I highly recommend the MakerBot Replicator Mini+.

Easy setup•Can run it via your smartphone•Fun

Printing still takes a while•Not quiet•Expensive

MakerBot Replicator Mini+ is not cheap, but is an effective, fun, mobile-friendly and easy-to-use 3D printer.

Topics:3d printerGadgetsMakerBotMashable ChoicereviewsTech

is a global, multi-platform media and entertainment company. Powered by its own proprietary technology, Mashable is the go-to source for tech, digital culture and entertainment content for its dedicated and influential audience around the globe.

Reproduction without explicit permission is prohibited. All Rights Reserved.

Designed in collaboration withCode & Theory

3D printing with MakerBots Replicator

will start after this message from our sponsors.

3D printing with MakerBots Replicator

MakerBots Replicator 3D printer is the most polished, most powerful 3D printer for under $2,000. Just be sure to brace yourself for a learning curve.

Hi. Im Rich Brown, Senior Editor for CNET. Today were gonna take a look at the Makerbot Replicators 3D printer. So, this is the first 3d printer we reviewed here at CNET. Chances are, if youve heard 3d printing, youve also heard of Makerbot. Makerbot has been on the forefront on the sort of consumer serge that 3d printing is enjoying lately, Now, its not to say this printer isnt necessarily cheap or that theyre overly user friendly, that said, theyre finally on the realm of affordability for the average consumer. So replicators probably one of the more expensive consumer oriented 3d printers. The reason is, because it has 2 different inputs here for the plastic that you use to actually print objects. That makes it unique. Theres no other printer in this price range that incredibly has that ability. Now speaking of price for the dual excrution capability that replicate our cost, 1999. So its certainly not cheap but thats not necessarily out of the real of what we expect from new technology. So the way 3d printing works is you start with a 3d design file. You can either design it yourself and something like Google sketch up or you can scan an object into a couple of different ways you can do that. Most of them are pretty DIY at this point though. Finally, you can go and download plans from other sources. Makerbot in particular owns a site called singer burst that holds over 15000 plans that are all freely available for you to download and print out objects from them on this printer. So once you have a plan and you load it on the file for. It tells the printer to print out plastic in a series of layers building gradually up until you get a finished solid object. So, just to show you what the plastic looks like. Here in the back, weve got white and black. Both of these are included with the Makerbot. Each of this is about 2 pounds of plastic. It runs up here to this plastic tube and into this scooter head we saw at front. So, its great that the replicator material is that it can print with two different colors and you can add into that, the same time, one object can comprise of two different colors or it can print, say 1 object in white, one object in black or you can do those at the same time, depending on the file and the lay out and the various software settings that you have. Now this plastic here is called ABS. It stands for long chemical name which buried from right now. Now, the printer comes with black and white and you can actually buy all kinds of different colors and a couple of different materials from Makerbot and various other sources online. The full of this stuff cost about 50 bucks. So once you have your design and the plastic is loaded up, scooter head moves here along the x axis as well as the z axis and this build place moves up and down for the y axis. So its actually pretty simple mechanic process the way this all works out. Although, as we found, printing is one these things and expecting to get exactly what you see on the design is a little bit tricky. Now the build place also warms up and has different port stays at a certain temperature in order to keep the object in place as its printing. Theres every work involved in order to get a print exactly how you want it and you probably have to spend a little bit of time. Especially if you wanna print something as complicated. There are other 3d printers out there aside form Makerbot and theyre also some DIY kit you can make to build the 3d printer yourself. From what weve seen though, Makerbot seems to be the most polished product on the market, at least right now. Now part of that polish comes from sort of the technical advance you get from having 2 different colors but also its inter-phase is pretty great. So over here, theres an LED stand and control panel and theres actually even an ST card input. So it lets you change setting on the printer and actually prints the printer without using a computer. Now in order for this printer yet has those features, at least that weve seen. Although, were pretty sure that well see for the end of the year from others. What I would not recommend is buying 3d printers. You dont wanna put the time in to get your object to look right and that can take a lot of work. For now though, this appears to be the most capable 3d printer out there for under $2000. So, Im Rich Brown. This is the Makerbot Replicator.

Watch Lifeprint mobile prints come to life through your iPhone

Canon laser printer gets greedy with toner refills

The worlds smallest all-in-one printer costs $70

Take back your work space with the compact Epson XP-430 all-in-one…

Stymied by slow print speeds, this Brother printer cant keep…

Epson EcoTank printer does away with ink cartridges, opts for…

A capable multifunctional printer for under $150

The Brother MFC-470DW is a sub-$100 all-in-one printer that plays…

The XYZprinting Nobel 1.0 3D Printer is hella cool but expensive…

HP Officejet 4630: a true multifunction printer with additional…

Watch Lifeprint mobile prints come to life through your iPhone

With Lifeprints iOS app, you can attach a video or GIF to a Hyperphoto print and make it play like a video. Just point an iPhone camera…

Printer Buying Guide: What to look for when printer shopping

CNETs Justin Yu, whos been reviewing printers since 2008, tells you what features and technologies matter most, and which ones you…

Canon laser printer gets greedy with toner refills

Until Canon lowers the price of toner refills, we recommend you stay away from this laser printer

The worlds smallest all-in-one printer costs $70

HP says the Deskjet 3755 is the worlds smallest printer that can scan, too. Thats not actually true, but it does cost just $70 and…

Take back your work space with the compact Epson XP-430 all-in-one printer

This small-in-one is a strong partner for anyone with light to medium color printing needs who will appreciate its ability to print…

Stymied by slow print speeds, this Brother printer cant keep up with the competition

This Brother multifunction printer is priced right, but ultimately gets bogged by slow print speeds and a handful of design flaws.

Epson EcoTank printer does away with ink cartridges, opts for DIY refills

The ET-2550 is the most affordable printer in Epsons new line of EcoTank multifunction printers. It includes two years worth of ink…

A capable multifunctional printer for under $150

The HP Envy 4520 all-in-one is the first printer to feature the companys updated Instant Ink smart cartridges. Choose between a traditional…