Learn and Explore

Applies to 2018.1 Update and later Provides a quick guide to which commands are new in this release. 2018.1 New Commands and System Variables New commands Description AutoCAD AutoCAD LT NEWVIEW Saves a new, named view from whats displayed in the current

The customization (CUIx) file defines the default shortcut keys. You can use the default shortcut keys as examples when creating your own shortcut keys. The following table lists the default actions for shortcut keys

The customization (CUIx) file defines the default temporary override keys. You can use the default temporary override keys as examples when creating your own temporary override keys

The Customization guide provides you with an overview of the main topics that cover customizing custom settings and files, and migrating from a previous release

When you open a command topic in the Help system, in most cases you will see the icon of the command tool followed by the word, Find

When you open a command topic in the Help system, in most cases you will see the icon of the command tool followed by the word, Find. If you click Find, a red arrow appears, pointing to a location on the ribbon, the Application menu, or the status bar. I

result.published timeToUnix amDateFormat:LL 0 class=resultSource>

result.source contributedByTextcontributedByText trustedHtml(result.userName) result.duration secondsToDateTime

Tell us about your issue and find the best support option.

Get answers fast from Autodesk support staff and product experts in the forums.

Connect, consult with, and hire trusted industry experts on the Autodesk Services Marketplace.

Autodesk is a leader in 3D design, engineering and entertainment software.

© Copyright 2017 Autodesk Inc. All rights reserved

Except where otherwise noted, work provided on Autodesk Knowledge Network is licensed under aCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.Please see theAutodesk Creative Commons FAQfor more information.

THE BAT – STL Files for 3D Printing

How to design 3D clothing or elastic elements for 3D Printing !

Superheroes League – FULL !!! 6 characters

Superheroes League – FULL !!! 6 characters for 3D Printing

STAR WARS – BARC speeder / 3D Printable Model

Full superheroes scene – Diorama for 3D printing. Five heroes !!!

BATMAN Diorama – STL Files for 3D Printing

Catwoman Silhouette – 3D Printable Model

SCORPION – Mortal Fight / 3D Printable Model

Ghost Biker – 3D Model for 3D Printing

Facebook Group by (Malic Sergiu) – SANIX 3D Printing Club

Avengers scene – Captain America 3D Printable Model

Mech Warrior BattleMaster 3D Model Assembly

Mech Warrior – KODIAK / 3D Printable Assembly Action Figure

Harley Quinn – Suicide Squad – 3D Printing Model Static

MechWarrior – King Crab Action Figure for 3D Printing

Devil Chopper Motorcycle 3D Printable Model

Chisinau City Hall 3D model – during the interwar …

Star Wars – Corvette Ship 3D Printable Model

StarCraft – Hyperion Space Ship / 3D Printable Model

MADCAT ( Timber Wolf ) Battletech Classic 3D Printable Model

MAD DOG ( Vulture) Battletech Classic / 3D Printab…

How to buy STL Files, Step by Step instructions

How to design 3D clothing or elastic elements for …

TANK M-55 – 3D Model for 3D Printing

Star Wars – Ebon Hawk Ship – 3D Model for 3D Pri…

TANK Model AMX 13 ( Upgraded MOD ) – 3D Model for …

I am a 3D designer (generalist) with more than 8 years of experience. I work in such software as Autodesk Maya, 3D Max, ZBrush, Mudbox, CINEMA 4D, KeyShot, and etc. to design models and to bring them to life in the virtual world. I am passionate about video games, so its understandable why I design game characters and objects. 3D printing gives me the possibility to make these models take shape in the physical form.

In this blog, you will see a lot of video games related models, optimized for 3D printing, with HIGH-POLY quality, and measuring from 5 Mb to 80 Mb.

New models are published at least once per week. Do pop here regularly and download the one that you like the most!

All suggestions to improve and make this blog look better, by adding either new 3D models or 3D printing related articles, are welcome!

Created by Sergiu MalicCopyright Designed and Developed By Bthemez

Organizing hundreds of stl files for 3D printing

I currently teach SOLIDWORKS at Clemson University while working on my Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. Each semester I train about 100 students in two sections of the SOLIDWORKS class how to model 3D parts and assemblies, how to make engineering drawings, and how to use the animation, simulation, andPhotoView360 tools within SOLIDWORKS. 300 to 500 students take the course each semester. The course requires students to complete ten homework assignments, daily quizzes (we call them In Class Assignments (ICAS)), take the SOLIDWORKS Associates Test (CSWA), and complete three projects. For the first project, students design a simple bottle and lid which screw together. We encourage the student to be creative and make interesting designs. Ive seen students make their bottle look like things ranging from famous buildings to a miniature Darth Vader. The bottle and lid must fit inside a 3.0 x 1.5 x 1.5-inch bounding box. Also, we 3D print all the bottles and caps of each student and return the printed model to each student. Because I setup the 3D printers in the general engineering department, I was tasked with printing all the bottles and lids. Given that about 500 students were taking the class during the Spring 2016 semester, this task was a bit overwhelming at first.

Objective: 3D Print several hundred .stl files in the shortest time possible using two or more 3D printers.

I only visit the 3D printer lab once a day. I would prefer going at the same time every day (i.e., 8:30 am).

Must be able to identify which bottle and cap belongs to which student.

We use aMakergear M2andLuzbot Taz 5as the two 3D printers.

Print each section of the SOLIDWORKS class together (i.e. there are five teachers. Print each teachers sections all at once so we can return the 3D models to the students in each section all at once).

Clemson currently usesBlackboardas the course management system. The students will submit a .zip file containing the two .stl files, two .sldpart files and one assembly file .sldasm. Blackboard will rename each students .zip file to have their username between underscores, for example, project1_anthonygarland_myproject1.zip.

We useGraderworksto check for cheating.

Makergear M2 3D Printer with bottles and caps on the build plate

The code used in this solution is found onGitHubasrelease 1.1.

The first task was to run all of the students files through graderworks. Graderworks was helpful in that it will unzip all the files and put them into a folder with the students username (*). So, project1_anthonygarland_myproject1.zip becomes a folder called anthonygarland. Also, we always check everything students turn in for cheating using Graderworks.

Second, I need to find all the .stl files that were submitted. To find all the .stl files, I wrote a Matlab script (because my colleagues are more familiar with Matlab and VBA than say Python) to loop over the folders and find all the .stl files. The function is called GetListOfStlFiles. The output of this function is a list of stlFile objects. These objects are defined in the stlFile.m file.

Third, I want to sort the list of .stl files by the students class section number. To do this, I use the SortFilesBySection function. This function first reads a .csv file which has four columns (last name, first name, username, section number). The function assigns each stlFile object a section number, students first name, and students last name, and then sorts the list by section number.

Next, the list is passed to the ExportStlFilesInFolderGroupsWithImages function. This function does several things

Puts the .stl files into groups of 18. In my experience I can print 18 .stl files ** all at once, and this print job will take about 24 hours. I only want to visit the 3D printing lab once a day at the same time, so making print jobs that take slightly less than 24 hours is crucial.

Renames each .stl file to have the students username. Typically, students submit files with names like bottle.stl, cap.stl, container.stl, and lid.stl which is not helpful in identifying the creator of the file. The Matlab code will rename each file to have the username-FileNumber.stl. So, my bottle.stl will become anthonygarland-file1.stl.

It records whos 3D model is in which group by populating a CSV file (3dprint.csv). The column headings are group number, file number, groups folder path, files new absolute path, username, section number, first name, and last name. Later, I save this as an excel spreadsheet and use it to keep track of which bottles Im printing and have printed.

3dprint.xlsx (made from the 3dprint.csv generated by the script) used to keep track of which bottles are printed.

Saves an image of each .stl files three orthogonal views and an isometric view. Saving an image of each .stl file is helpful because then we can quickly identify which bottle and cap belong to which student when each 3D printed group is finished.

Example bottle with three orthogonal views and the isometric view. Username and file number are in the title of each image.

Using this script saved me tons of time by putting all the .stl files needed for a 24-hour print into a single folder so that I didnt have to search through the students file submissions to find their .stl files. Also, I can select all the files at once when importing them into Simplify3D for slicing. After each print is finished, it is a relatively simple task to look at the images of the .stl files in each folder to identify which physical 3D model belongs to which username.

Simplify3D slicer with bottles and caps for a single group

Toolpath Preview in Simplify3D for bottles and caps for a single group

I used the following existing Matlab projects from the Matlab file exchange when putting together my script.

* If you dont have Graderworks, then you could write a Matlab script that unzips all the folders using theunzipfunction

** 18 files means 9 complete bottle and caps. Remember, they must fit inside a 3.0 x 1.5 x 1.5-inch bounding box.

Grade students SOLIDWORKS files quickly

Export SOLIDWORKS files to another format in bulk

Graderworks: SW 2017, Config files, Command line args

Graderworks 2.36 and higher is compatible with SOLIDWORKS 2017. Graderworks now

Garland Industries is happy to announce that Graderworks is now an official SOL

Several more improvements have been made to Graderworks in version 2.35.

Graderworks 2.32 represents continued incremental improvement in the overall qua

A design automation example is given showing topology optimization coupled with

Graderworks 2.31 includes the following updates. 1. When analyzing .stl files th

Update on Graderworks 2.3 Several major bugs were fixed.

Graderworks 2.3 allows you to compare the geometric similarity of .stl files wit

Graderworks is the Turnitin of 3D models. Not using a plagiarism checker in a So

This tutorial shows how to get started analyzing and grading Solidworks part fil

As an engineering entrepreneur, marketing is not my strength. To make high-quali

How would you 3D print hundreds of .stl files in the shortest time possible usin

3D Printing offers many new exciting possibilities, but why is it unique? Three

3D Printing requires three steps. 1. Getting a 3D model. 2. Slicing the model to

Solidworks students submit .rar files instead of .zip. Graderworks requires .zip

A short tutorial on how to sign a Windows installer and what the smart screen fi

3D Printing opens the possibility of mass customization of consumer products. Ma

Does software make it from academic research to useful commercial tools? Ignoran

Print 3D objects from Photoshop

The 3D printing feature in Photoshop CC simplifies the process of printing your 3D creations. You can print your 3D objects on your own 3D printer, export the object for printing, or print to a 3D printing service.

Convert your 2D design to 3D and modify the scale and depth of the object.

If you need any help or have questions along the way, let us know inour forum.

Learn how to set up your model, try different materials, and send your model to the Shapeways3D printing service.

Upload your model to the Sketchfab service and then embed the Sketchfab code on Behance to share your 3D creation with the world.

Post questions and get answers from experts.

Selecting a region changes the language and/or content on .

Middle East and North Africa – English

Moyen-Orient et Afrique du Nord – Franais

Southeast Asia (Includes Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam) – English

Includes Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan

To Send a 3D Model to a 3D Printing Service

To translate this article, select a language.

Portugus (Brasil) (Brazilian Portuguese)

To Send a 3D Model to a 3D Printing Service

AutoCAD 2016, AutoCAD Architecture 2016, AutoCAD Civil 3D 2016, AutoCAD Electrical 2016, AutoCAD MEP 2016, AutoCAD Map 3D 2016, AutoCAD Mechanical 2016, AutoCAD P&ID 2016, AutoCAD Plant 3D 2016, AutoCAD Structural Detailing 2016, & AutoCAD Utility Design 2016

Open the DWG file that contains the 3D model you wish to print.

Optimize your model for 3D printing.

In the 3D Printing – Prepare Model for Printing dialog box, click Continue.

In the selected DWG file, select the solids or watertight meshes you wish to print.

In the Send to 3D Print Service dialog box, specify output dimensions, including scale and bounding box length, width, and height.

If you modify output dimensions, the output preview remains unchanged.

Save your prepared drawing as an STL file.

Select a 3D printing service provider.

Follow the directions on your service providers website to:

Get answers fast from Autodesk support staff and product experts in the forums.

Tell us about your issue and find the best support option.

Get answers fast from Autodesk support staff and product experts in the forums.

Connect, consult with, and hire trusted industry experts on the Autodesk Services Marketplace.

Autodesk is a leader in 3D design, engineering and entertainment software.

© Copyright 2017 Autodesk Inc. All rights reserved

Except where otherwise noted, work provided on Autodesk Knowledge Network is licensed under aCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.Please see theAutodesk Creative Commons FAQfor more information.

Copying Printing

Receive alerts from Dalhousie by text message.

There are strict rules regarding photocopying of academic material as defined in theCanadian Copyright Act.

Please consult theFair Dealing pagefor the requirements for scanned and photocopied materials for academic use.

Visit ourguide to the public domainfor information on finding and using publicly available works.

Copyright Officeif you are uncertain about copyright, fair dealing, or the public domain.

Printers and Photocopiers are available at all Dalhousie Libraries.

Large format printing is available at the Killam Library

Ensure you have enough money on your DalCard ID or Visitors card

Archives and Special Collections materials*

Oversized Archives and Special Collections materials*

+ The Dunn Library has one printer for public use. Printing is Black & White, single-sided only. Cost is $0.10

* Archives and Special Collections materials are normally photocopied by staff.

When you print something using a Learning Commons computer, your document goes into a print queue. EachLearning Commons computer defaults to a black and white printer, and defaults to double-sided printing.If you want to print single-sided, adjust the printing options before sending your document to the printer.See the chart above for printing costs.Charges will be deducted from your DalCard.

, swipe your DalCard ID or login with your NetID and password, and follow any directions that appear on the screen.

At the Sexton Library this step is not necessary, as documents automatically print and charges will be deducted from your DalCard.

When you print something using an Express Workstation computer in the library, your document goes into a print queue. Ensure you have enough money on your DalCard ID or Visitors card to print. Documents that are not printed within an hour will be deleted from the print queue.

When the Login box appears, enter your NetID and password. If you do not have a netID, use the number posted at the top of the monitor as the username and the password.

swipe your Dalcard ID or Visitors card, and follow any directions that appear on the screen.

If you are a current Dalhousie student, staff or faculty member, you can use your laptop to print to a printer at a Dalhousie Library. Please log inhereand selectWeb Printfrom the menu.

The Killam Help Desk operates a poster printing service. The HP Designjet T2300 large format printer can print maps and posters up to 36 inches wide. Two types of paper are available. Matte paper is priced at $9 per linear foot, satin paper is $10 per linear foot.

More than 5 posters may require more than one business day, dependent on current workload.

Payment is made after printing with cash, credit, debit or Dalcard.

If paying with departmental funds, please bring thiscompleted formwith you.

If you have questions about lead time for a high volume of posters, for example if you are responsible for organizing poster print for a conference, please .  If we are notified ahead of time we can make arrangements with you to ensure your printing is done on time.

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2

3D Printing an Ironman Helmet

Early last year, before The Avengers came out, I approached the rapid prototyping department at my company and asked if they would be able to help me produce a replica Ironman helmet. I had tried building the helmet with pepakura files produced by a member of the , but I found I did not have the time/patience/skill to sit and trim out hundreds of pieces of paper and reassemble them. This is my first instructable, but I wanted to share my process for anyone who has been interested in going this route. I took photos and screen caps along the way, but I may have missed a few steps that Ill just have to explain.

Ive added separate zip files with OBJ and STL files of the Ironman helmet pieces for others to use. Please credit the Replica Prop Forum and I, if you use! As I outline inStep Two, the build envelope of the printer that was used to produce this helmet was 10 x 14 x 8, so I had scaled the pieces to fit that and it is sort of a happy accident that it worked out. 🙂

As I mentioned, I had gotten the pepakura helmet file from the RPF forum. I had also purchased a copy of the Pepakura software. With a full version that allows you to create files rather than just view, I exported the pepakura file as an OBJ which I could would with in Maya. The conversion process was easy, but because the pep file is meant for paper usage, it was relatively low resolution and had no thickness.

The first step, while the poly count was low, was to extrude the model inward to give the helmet thickness. Thickness is important, it provides stability to the final product which can be brittle when it is printed too thin. Because I planned on wearing this, (and probably walking into walls/doors/people) I wanted it to be thick enough the handle a bit of abuse. The final helmet varies in thickness because while the outside has grooves and ridges, I wanted the inside to be smooth. That way, the sides and bottoms of the grooves would have extra material around then to prevent fractures. The overall helmet averages between .125 and .25 thick.

When I was done adjusting the silhouette of the low poly helmet, I subdivided the model to provide a smoother finished surface. As youll see later, I could have gone even further with this step.

The printer that this model would be created with was a Spectrum z510, which has a build area of 10 x 14 x 8. Knowing that, I could see that the helmet would not fit into the printer in a single piece, so I needed to divide the model into pieces I could then easily reassemble.

To make the breakdown correctly, I created a box in the same proportion as the build area. I chose to divide the helmet down the middle so I would have a single seam to cover.

Unfortunately, I dont have and pictures of the helmet being printed. So Ill just have to explain this part.

When I was happy with the way the pieces fit within the box, I deleted the box shape, exported the stack as an STL file and sent it off the the prototyping group.

Several days later, I got a call that the pieces were finished but there was some damage. When the pieces were printed, they were coated with a hardener/epoxy resin then put into the oven to cure. Because the helmet pieces were too thin, they warped, buckled and cracked while in the oven. Because of the varied thickness, some parts hardened faster than others. You can see this in the uneven color of the helmet halves. The bottoms were thicker than the top which ended up distorting.

The faceplate was thick enough and didnt end up warping. As you can see in the second picture, you can still see some of the tessellation from modeling. If I had further subdivided the model, these blocky areas would have been less prevalent.

I went back to my original files and did some more thickening, bulking up the whole thing to the .125-.25 I mentioned before. The second picture is what resulted from that printing. But I also requested that they skip the epoxy hardener since I would be sanding, fiberglassing, and using filler on the seams. Overall, it was a much better print.

The first image is from a little later in the process, but I forgot to take a picture of the inside during first assembly. To connect the two halves of the helmet, I clamped the halves together, then laid down 3 layers of fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin. Once the inside hardened, I went through several rounds adding a thin layer of bondo to the outside and sanding to fill the gap on the exterior surface. The second and third versions show the results of bondo and sanding.

Remember to wear rubber gloves, long sleeves, breathing mask and eye protection throughout this process. Fiberglass dust can be very irritating to your skin and painful in your eyes!

As you could see in the last step, Ive used cabinet top hinges to control the opening and closing of the face plate. As you can see from the sanded patch behind its location, positioning these correctly was pretty tricky. First I hot glued the top piece to the top edge of the interior face of the faceplate. I then put the helmet on to find out where about my temples were and marked a point a bit forward and up from that point. I attached the body of the hinge to this point and spent quite a bit of time opening and closing to find the correct distance and angle to allow the faceplate to rest just above the eye line. I will show later how I kept the faceplate open once it is up there.

Since the neck opening is not large enough to get my head through, I added center release buckles to each side, with half on the jaw and half on the helmet. Once I was happy with the placement, I traced off the position of the buckle, removed it and added a small amount of gorilla glue. Then carefully placed the buckle back while preventing the glue to seep into the space between the helmet and jaw, OR onto the release button for the buckle. I added weight and let it sit overnight.

Once the hinges and jaw connetors were worked out, I added a layer of padding to make the helmet snug and keep it from jostling around when I moved my head. This was simple, I simply cut several 1 wide strips of foam and attached them to the back with a dab of hot glue. The two wide horizontal pieces prevent my neck from sliding too far back and bring my eyes closer to the holes in the mask. Adding the padding made it much easier to turn my head and made it much more comfortable than having the hard plastic pressing against my skin.

Unfortunately, I forgot to take a lot of photos during this phase. I was doing a lot of trial and error to get the right combination of angles and lights. What I did end up with is a .375 wide circuit board, with 5 superbright white LEDs inside a container made from an index card and electrical tape.

This was my first experience working with LEDs or any sort of circuits so to be safe (because the battery is less than an inch from my face, I wanted no overheating or exploding) I have the split into two groups two LEDs connected to 1 capacitor and the other three connected to another capacitor. It does dim the light output noticably but it protects my eyes, the battery, and the LEDs and it still remains pretty bright.

As you can see from picture 4. I had to do a bit of work sealing off the light from leaking through the surrounding plastic. Several layers of black primer on the interior and 2 layers of grey primer on the exterior as well as better enclosing the light casing, and I was able to solve the light leaking.

Finally, under the decorative screwhead on the right side of the mask, I placed an on off switch that I pulled out of a tap light from the dollar store. This allow me to turn the lights off while wearing the mask without having a visible switch.

Picture 1: Test photo when under construction.

Picture 2: Shows piece I cut from eye as template

Picture 3: Completed eyes, wiring and battery holder.

Not much secret to show here. Just several layers of primer and lots of sanding sanding to smooth the surface. As you can see on the forehead, just below the widows peak, the tessellation of my model is still showing through a bit. I used a sandable primer so that I could work out a few of the divots that had made it through to this point. Because the faceplate is the most prominent feature of the helmet, I ended up sanding it down to nearly bare plastic several times to get the smoothness I wanted.

Remember your Spray Painting 101 lessons: Only paint in a well ventilated space. The primer I was dry to the touch in 15 min and sandable within 30. Volatile chemicals make for fancy paints but bad lungs.

For the painting, the colors were both Duplicolor Perfect Match colors: the Red was Medium Garnet Red Metallic and the Gold was Sunburst Gold Metallic. I put 4-5 thin coats of paint on with a very light sanding between each coat.

Again, remember to wear breathing protection in a well ventilated area for this step. Automotive paints are brutal to your lungs.

As I said before, heres how I finally figured out how to keep the faceplate up. I created a slight recess in the upper rim of the face opening and glued a .1875 round rare earth magnet in the opening. Then I had to get a little creative on how to attach the magnets to the hinge arm. I ended up cutting a short length of wire that would span the width of the arm and would be more area to attach the magnet to. On one side, I need to add a second magnet because the first wasnt making contact. (I inset the helmet magnet a bit too far)

I was told to lightly wet sand the surface with 2000 grit when I was finished painting, but I havent yet as I like the mild diffusion that the surface has.

Also, for a bit more ear comfort, I added black felt to both sides of the helmet. If I havent mentioned it before, raw prints feel a bit like sandpaper and the tips of my big ears dont appreciate the feeling after a short while.

Hope this has been helpful! Let me know if there are any questions!

Great work. Wish I had access to a 3D printer now more than ever.

You could run the files through pepakura and create a cardstock version.

best use for a 3D printer yet! great work, now i want a 3D printer even more, thanks alot!

what software did you use to make that one?

would there be a way to fit it in 270*210*200mm and be wearable

Hi love the work and just HVE one question Id like to purchase a 3D printer soon and wanted to know what printer would be good for a beginner but would also be powerful enough and large enough to print armor pieces Im a HUGE iron man and comic book fan and plan on spending 99% of my materials and time printing armors than anything else and wanted to know what printer would suffice for such work thanks and have a great day

Congratulations! You have been featured as one of the Top Halloween models for the year! To see your model and other Halloween models

Ive ran the models through an STL viewer, but the scale for the face mask is small enough to be a pencil eraser topper. Can you offer this in proper scale

I have sadly lost the original files for this, so what is available is it. 🙁

Though as I said in the steps, I had originally only scaled it to fit within the build envelope of the machine that was being used. It was basically by accident that it ended up fitting my head and just barely at that…(tips of my ears are rather sore after wearing it for short periods.

Someone else in the comments had mentioned to try switching the STL from MM to inches. That might work for you.

I freaking hate Iron man but this…. this is sooo awesome! Many Kudos to you good sir!

Could you explain a bit more how the light shining out of the eyes effect works. I have a plastic store bought helmet that id like to try this on.

I sort of cobbled those pieces together. I cut a small piece of circuit board and soldered several LEDs to it, then with some index cards and tape, I shaped an enclosure to mount the LEDs. Once I was satisfied with the shape and size, I cut a thin piece of frosted plastic. If I remember correctly, it was from a tupperware container. I then heavily wrapped the sides and top edge in electrical tape to prevent any light leakage from behind. Not a super elegant solution, but it worked.

IMPOSSIBRU ( Translation: awesomeness….)

is it possible to get editable source files so i can cut the pices up for my printer?

I use Sketchup, and import the STL… Then you can slice and dice to your hearts content.

I have a Dremel 3D printer, and when i load the file provided on to the software for the printer, each piece is microscopic. What is the scale I should use to make the helmet fit my head?

Usually when this happens it is because the printer is expecting mm as the unit of measurement, but the stl is using inches… I usually bring it into sketchup (importing it with the options of inches) to ensure this is correct, and then re-export it in mm…

what I meant to say is that the printer software is expecting it in mm… Same overall meaning, but trying to avoid confusion.

Hi, but the size of helmet is it ok for every size of head or i should edit the helmet size in its file?

Hi! Wow, excellent job, may I ask what kind of 3-D printer you used for this? I am in the market for one and could use something that keeps detail real well

Very nice. I just bought a makerbot z18 (after returning the other 5th gen replicator I purchased when they first launched a year or so ago) and it has been nothing but incredible. The first one I sent back due to constant clogging of the extruder. But this is great.. I have printed 5 things so far and 4 of them are 50 hours plus. I just finished the SPACE NEEDLE which was a 72 hour print w/o a single issue…so now I want to print this helmet. You did an awesome job on. Oh, once I put it on the platform it is really tiny….what size is full scale?

Think.Print 3D can print a helmet our printer can print 16x14x16.

I notice that the STL files you provided are not to scale (they are very small). Can you provide dimensions of the helmet so I can scale the STL files properly? I have a FlashForge Dreamer and I dont think it will fit all in one shot. Therefore, Ill need to cut the STLs in to a couple peices and glue together.

I tried to print your files but they arent scaled in mm or in inch.

also use a good fan with a hepa filter on it to suck the dust away from you as well.

how much time it took to 3D print it!!!!!

Is it possible for you to share the files, or do you sell this commercially? 🙂

Is it possible for you to share the files, or do you sell this commercially? 🙂

please help me, i cant open the file

Gridlock, you have to use Makerware (search it up) or 123D print.

when I downloaded the stl file, the objects were tiny. Can you tell me what your dimensions of it were? Also, do you think it will fit on a Makerbot Replicator 2? Thank you!

is your back part removable or not??

I hope to see you print the rest of the armor in the near future.

could you modify the obj files in Autodesk Inventor and do the same thing you did in Maya? I was thinking about doing this with the Mark 42

Do you have any recommendations to cut the helmet to fit an 8x8x8 build cube? Thanks!

i need an application that can open the files

Thanks all! It was a lot of work, but very fun. Glad to see others appreciate the work that went into it. I cant believe that its gotten so many views in such a short time.

Let your inbox help you discover our best projects, classes, and contests. Instructables will help you learn how to make anything!

Exporting Clean STL Files for 3D Printing

One challenge we are always facing with new 3D printing customers lies in having them export clean .STL files from their CAD program.  Many times, customers will simply change their file to .STL file time, export, and send to us.  This can work occasionally, but there are certain tips and tricks that can help give you a cleaner .STL file, that will work better with a 3D printer.  Many times, the file is a lower resolution, and this can lead to stair-stepping or other imperfections that look like a malfunction with the printer. However, many times the printer is just doing what its told, and the issue lies within the 3D file itself.

We offer a3D printing servicefor our customers, and we like to provide tips & tricks for exporting a clean .STL file that will produce the highest quality 3D part.

How to Export Clean .STL Files for 3D Printing

After designing a model in a CAD program, you save or export the design as an STL file (Most modern CAD programs have this function). An STL file renders surfaces in the CAD design as a mesh of triangles. The number and size of the triangles determine how accurately curved surfaces are printed. You control the number and size of the triangles by setting the following parameters when you create the STL file from the CAD design, this method varies by the program you use:

The maximum distance between the surface of the original design and the tessellated surface of the STL triangle.

The angular deviation allowed between adjacent triangles. This setting enables you to increase tessellation, necessary for surfaces with small radii. The smaller the radii, the more triangles are needed, and the smoother the surface is.

You usually have the option to save STL files in either binary or ASCII format. (ASCII files can be visually read and checked, but are 6 times larger.) Please only send us binary files to quote and print.

What settings does your CAD software use?

Each CAD software program has different settings, but each can be configured to export quality .STL files for 3D printing.  See a list of the most common programs and how to export .STL files on ourpart printing page.

Interested in learning more about 3D printing?  We are an Atlanta-based Stratasys 3D printer reseller, focused on bringing customers the best customer service possible, and taking the guesswork out of the 3D printer research process (with our3D printing demo center).  Pleasecontactour team with any questions or concerns!

Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)

Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)

Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)

3D design,3D Models,3D Printer,Best Practices,Uncategorized

Stratasys Infinite-Build Demonstrators Will be Displayed at IMTS 2016

Going Up? SODIMAS Elevators Boosts Efficiency with Stratasys 3D Printing

MondayFriday: 8:305:30 (Eastern Time)

With over 20 years experience in 3D Printing we strive to provide the best service to our customers. Located in Metro Atlanta we serve the Southeast US for 3D Printer Needs and everywhere for 3D Printing Service.

MXD3D

Modified on: Wed, 4 Jun, 2014 at 10:15 PM

Note: This shows how to export files to STL format, which is the required format for using our pricing calculator. If you want to print in color, please attach a .WRL (multicolor/textured parts), or a .OBJ .3DS, .STP if requested by the printer.

After designing a model in a CAD program, you save the design as an STL file. (Most CAD programs have this function.) An STL file renders surfaces in the CAD design as a mesh of triangles. The number and size of the triangles determine how accurately curved surfaces are printed. You control the number and size of the triangles by setting the following parameters when you create the STL file from the CAD design:

The maximum distance between the surface of the original design and the tessellated surface of the STL triangle.

The angular deviation allowed between adjacent triangles. This setting enables you to increase tessellation, necessary for surfaces with small radii. (The smaller the radii, the more triangles are needed).

You usually have the option to save STL files in either binary or ASCII format. Binary files are smaller (by a factor of 6!), so this format is usually preferred. However, ASCII files can be visually read and checked.

Model designs containing holes and gaps adversely affect the quality of the printed model. Therefore, you should perform a geometry check of the STL files before continuing. Thirdparty software for this purpose attempts to fix the geometry of problematic files.

Go to the File menu, then select the Save Copy As option

Select STL from the Types drop-down

Click the Options button, and choose the High detail level

Autodesk Inventor allows you to save both individual parts and

assemblies in STL format, at all design levels.

Phase 1: Saving a model design in STL format

To save an Autodesk Inventor model design as an STL file:

From the Tools menu, select Rebuild All. This ensures that the design data contains recent changes, and that it is not corrupt.

From the File menu, select Save Copy As To Save copy as dialoge box opens

In the Save as type field, select STL Files (*.stl), and click Options. The STLOut Save Options dialog box opens.

In the Save Copy As dialog box, click Save.

Note: To change the values associated with each of the resolution settings (High/Medium/Low) you need to edit the Windows registry.

Select the model and select Yes

Select Export type File name OK

Catia can import almost any design-file format, but only those that include solid data (IGES, STEP, Parasolid, etc.)

STL files can be saved with a special add-on module. Catia V5 is capable of creating STL files from parts (CatiaPART files), but not from assemblies (CatiaPRODUCT files) or geometrical representations (car files).

Therefore, source files, including those saved in a neutral format (STEP or IGES, for example), must be saved as parts. If the source design was saved as an assembly, it is imported to Catia as a product.

To create an STL file from it, you must first convert it to a multi-bodied part. The procedure described below is one of several methods for doing this.

Phase 1: Saving a model design in STL format

Opening and Preparing the Source File:

From the File menu, select Open, and open the source file. If the source design was saved as an assembly, it is imported as a CatiaPRODUCT model.

From the File menu, select New Part, and give it the name of one of the components.

In the product window, select this component, and copy it (with the Edit menu or the right-click pop-up menu).

In the part window, paste the component.

Repeat steps and until you have copied all of the components and pasted them as individual parts. Figure on the right shows the result of pasting the components of the product into individual part files.

From the File menu, select New Part, and give it a name suitable for the combined model.

Copy each of the individual components (parts) from the working files and paste them into the new (combined) model file.

Since the geometries of all of the parts are retained, they should be aligned correctly in the combined part. The new part is now ready to be exported as an STL file.

Phase 2: Re-aligning parts (if necessary)Occasionally, because of the way the original assembly was designed, some of the components may not align correctly in the combined part. If so, you must align them, using the Constraints feature, from the Insert menu.

Before saving the file, it is advisable to review the settings that determine the accuracy of the model and the size of the file. To see these parameters:

From the Tools menu, select Options.

In the Options dialog box, display the Performance tab.

Under the General category (on the left), select Display.

Pay attention to the 3D Accuracy settings.

Fixed The lower the setting, the finer the details of the model in the STL file. A very small setting results in a very large STL file. Curves accuracy ratio The higher the setting, the smoother the surface will be, when dealing with complex geometries, especially if surfaces contain sudden small changes with small radii (like the bumps on a golf ball).

Phase 3: Saving the Part as an STL File

After preparing the part, as described above, proceed as follows:

From the File menu, select Save As.

In the Save As dialog box, select stl from the Save as type pull-down list.

Since Catia5 supports non-continuous model designs, importing geometry into a part by copying and pasting is not problematic.

Ensure model is closed (watertight) and has thickness Convert to .STL using a supported plugin

With IronCAD, you can only save parts as STL files.

When working in assembly mode, you must save its component parts as individual STL files. The procedures for doing so are described below.

Saving a model design in STL format

Right-click on the part and, from the pop-up menu, select Part Properties The Part dialog box appears.

Make sure that the Rendering tab is displayed.

Change the Surface Smoothness setting to an appropriate value for your model.

If you have not established an appropriate value, try 150. The higher the number, the smoother the model surface will be.

Change the Max edge length setting to an appropriate value for your model. If you have not established an appropriate value, try 0.05. This setting produces good results, but increases file size and may require several minutes to render the model to STL format.

To create smoother model surfaces, when designing spherical and torus geometries, select the Triangulated mesh check box. Selecting this check box results in larger STL files, but may produce smoother curves in models. If the surfaces of the model design are planes, this setting does not improve the results.

Click OK to save the settings and close the dialog box.

From the File menu, select Export STL.

In the Stereolithography dialog box, make sure PC is selected, and select the Binary output check box.

Click OK to save the settings and create the STL file.

Select Detail Controls from Mesh Options

Max Angle = 20, Max aspect ration = 6, Min edge Length = 0.0001

McNeel Rhino – version 3 and laterRhino enables extensive control of STL properties when saving designs as STL files.

Because Rhino software is surface-based, the complete model design (even if an assembly) is saved as a single STL part.

Saving a model design in STL format

From the File menu, select Save As. The Save dialog box opens.

In the File name box, enter a name for the new STL file.

In the Save as type box, select Stereolithography [*.stl].

In the STL Mesh Export Options dialog box, set the STL tolerance the maximum distance allowed between the surface of the design and the polygon mesh of the STL file.

In the Polygon Mesh Detailed Options dialog box, set the STL tolerance in the field labeled Maximum distance, edge to surface, as shown in the figure.

If you do not know the other settings appropriate for your model design, try these: a)

Maximum distance edge to surface (Tolerance) less than half of the printers resolution. For example, the setting shown in the figures above (0.01 mm) is a good setting for printing models at a resolution of 30 ?m (0.03 mm).

In the STL Export Options dialog box, set the file type as Binary and click OK.

If the Export open objects check box is selected, STL files will be created for each of the objects currently open. If this check box is cleared, an STL file is created for the selected object.

Important: STL files are suitable for 3D printing if the models they describe are watertight – that is, they do not contain holes or gaps. If the following message appears, click Cancel and fixd the model design (see image FIgure 30) before saving it as an STL file.Troubleshooting Model DesignsIf a model design contains holes or gaps, it is not suitable for 3D printing. Before saving it as an STL file, you must make it watertight.

To close holes and gaps in a model design:

or Click the Join icon on the side toolbar. This command reduces the number of surfaces and fits them together tightly. (The entities are not fused together into one unit.) The message in the command bar indicates this.

Select the object. You can select the entire object, but to save time, you may select only the problematic entity.

From the Tools menu, select Polygon Mesh From NURBS Object. or Click the Mesh from Surface/Polysurface icon on the side toolbar. The Polygon Mesh Options dialog box opens.

Click Detailed Controls The Polygon Mesh Detailed Options dialog box opens.

Enter the same settings as before and click OK.

From the Tools menu, select Polygon Mesh Weld.

In the command bar, type 180 for the angle tolerance, and press Enter. With an angle tolerance of 180, the Weld command always merges adjacent triangle points.

From the Tools menu, select Polygon Mesh Unify Normals. This setting unifies the normals of all triangles, so that they have the same definition for up.

To validate that the object is watertight, type SelNakedMeshEdgePt in the command bar, and press Enter. If the resulting object contains holes or gaps, the mesh point is highlighted in the display.

Set chord height to 0. The field will be replaced by minimum acceptable value.

This is done at all levels of design, for both individual parts and assemblies. When dealing with assemblies, you can specify parts of an assembly to either include or exclude from the resulting STL file. Use the procedure below for saving both parts and assemblies as STL files for printing with 3D printers.

1. Check that the model design is continuous and watertight. This step is especially important if the design was imported from a neutral design format. Non-continuous bodies are likely to result in defective models. You cannot always check for continuity by examining the model displayed in shaded view. Therefore, use the following method:

View the model with hidden lines displayed.

From the View menu, select Display Setting Scheme PreWildfire. The model surfaces are displayed in magenta. If the design is continuous, the contour lines are white. If there are gaps, the lines are yellow.

Fix the model design, if necessary, before saving it as an STL file.

2. From the File menu, select Save a Copy. The Save a Copy dialog box appears.

3. From the Type pull-down menu, select STL.

Deviation ControlThe Deviation Control settings in the Export STL dialog box affect the accuracy of the model and the size of its file. Chord Height Also known as chordal tolerance, this setting specifies the maximum distance between the surface of the original design and the tessellated surface of the STL triangle (the chord). Therefore, the chord height controls the degree of tessellation of the model surface. The smaller the chord height, the less deviation from the actual part surface (but the bigger the file).

Angle ControlThis setting regulates how much additional tessellation occurs along surfaces with small radii. The smaller the radii, the more triangles are used. The setting can be between 0 and 1. Unless a higher setting is necessary, to achieve smoother surfaces, 0 is recommended.

4. When you have made all of the required settings, click Apply and OK to create the STL file.

Saving a Pro/E Assembly as an STL File1. From the File menu, select Save a Copy. The Save a Copy dialog box appears.

2. From the Type pull-down menu, select STL. The Export STL dialog box appears. In addition to the settings used when exporting a part STL, this dialog box enables you to specify the parts of an assembly to either include or exclude from the resulting STL file. In the dialog box one of the parts of the assembly (the tire) has been excluded, leaving two parts (the hub and the main wheel) to be exported to the STL file. The design resulting from these settings (when you click OK) is shown on the left.

3. When you have made all of the required settings, click Apply and OK to create the STL file.

Open Model & select File Save As

Options conversion tolerance to 0.015 mm

Solid Edge software from Siemens PLM (formerly USG) supports STL output at the core level, enabling you to save both parts and assemblies as STL files. Note, however, that when saving an assembly, all of its components are included in a single STL file.1

Phase 1: Saving a model design in STL format

From the File menu, click Save As. The Save As dialog box opens.

From the Save as type drop-down menu, select STL documents (*.stl) and click Options… The STL Export Options dialog box opens.

Set Conversation tolerance and Surface plane angle to appropriate values for your model. The lower the Conversation tolerance, the finer the tessellation. The lower the Surface plane angle, the greater the accuracy (noticeable in small details). As a rule, the finer the tessellation and the greater the accuracy, the larger the size of the STL file, and the longer it takes to generate it.

In the Output file as section, select Binary. Binary STL files are much smaller than STL files saved in ASCII format.

In the Save As dialog box, click Save.

Solid Edge is technically capable of creating individual STL files from the components of an assembly, but this functionality is not built into the program. It is achieved through the application programming interface (API), using Visual Basic scripts.

This solution does not enable a visual preview of the polygon mesh before saving the STL files.

STL settings: How to change STL settings

For a smoother STL file, change the Resolution to Custom

Change the deviation to 0.0005in (0.01 mm)

Change the angle to 5 (Smaller deviations and angles will produce a smoother file, but the file size will get larger)

Saving a model design in STL format

SolidWorks allows you to save model designs in STL format, at all levels of design, for both individual parts and assemblies, including the ability to save a multi-bodied model as a single STL. To save a model or a model assembly in STL Format:

From the File menu, select Save as. The Save As dialog box opens.

From the Save as type drop-down menu, select STL (*.stl).

Click Options… The Export Options dialog box appears, and the model is displayed in tessellated view. STL is the File Format selection.

In the Export Options dialog box, in the Output as section, select Binary. (The resulting file size will be much smaller than a file saved in ASCII format.)

In the Resolution section, select the appropriate option. If you select Custom, you can manually adjust the Deviation and Angle settings, as needed. These settings affect the tessellation of non-planar surfaces, as follows: a)

Lower Deviation settings result in finer tessellation. b)

Lower Angle settings result in with greater accuracy, noticeable in small details. c)

As a rule, the higher the resolution, the larger the size of the file, and the longer it takes to generate.

For Single Material Builds Make sure that the following check box is selected: Save all components of an assembly in a single file. This ensures that all components are saved as a single STL file.

For Dual Material Builds Make sure that the following check box is NOT selected: Save all components of an assembly in a single file. This ensures that all components are saved as separate STL files.

In the Save As dialog box, click Save.

In the confirmation message, click Yes.

File Export Rapid Prototyping

Triangle & Adjacency Tolerance: 0.015 mm

In case a error messages Negative coordinates found appears, it can be ignored

NX software from Siemens PLM (formerly USG), supports STL output at the core level, enabling you to save not only entire parts as STL files, but also selected surfaces of a part.

This gives you great flexibility when preparing objects for 3-D printing. In addition, assembly output enables you to save several components as a single unit while maintaining each component as a separate volume (shell).

Saving a model design in STL format

From the File menu, select Export STL The Rapid Prototyping dialog box opens.

Set Output Type to Binary. Binary STL files are much smaller than STL files saved in ASCII format.

Adjust the Triangle Tol setting to an appropriate value for your model. This is the maximum distance allowed between the surface of the original design and the tessellated surface of the STL triangle, and affects the smoothness of the model surface.

Adjust the Adjacency Tol setting. This determines if two adjacent surfaces attach. If the distance between the two surfaces is less than this setting, they are considered attached. This setting must be less than the printing resolution. For example, when printing models at a resolution of 30 micrometers (microns), the setting must be no more than 0.03.

In the Export Rapid Prototyping dialog box, enter file name and click OK.

We use cookies to try and give you a better experience in Freshdesk.

You can learn more about what kind of cookies we use, why, and how from ourPrivacy Policy. If you hate cookies, or are just on a diet, you can disable them altogether too. Just note that the Freshdesk service is pretty big on some cookies (we love the choco-chip ones), and some portions of Freshdesk may not work properly if you disable cookies.

Well also assume you agree to the way we use cookies and are ok with it as described in ourPrivacy Policy, unless you choose to disable them altogether through your browser.